Tobacco 21 Legislation Passes in Putnam

The American Heart Association offered praise to Putnam County Legislators for passage of Tobacco 21 legislation Tuesday night. The legislation calls for increasing the sales age of tobacco products, including cigarettes and vaping products, from 18 to 21 years of age. Putnam became the sixth Hudson Valley county to pass Tobacco 21 legislation in the past year. In the Hudson Valley, Orange, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester Counties now have similar laws. To date, roughly 75% of New Yorkers are covered by a Tobacco 21 law.

“The American Heart Association is thrilled with the outcome of this vote because of what it will do for the health of Putnam youth. A big thanks to the leadership of Legislator Barbara Scuccimarra who sponsored this bill,” said Caitlin O’Brien, American Heart Association Government Relations Director. “We hope state legislators take notice of the widespread support rolling through New York and act on a statewide bill this year. All residents of New York need to be protected.”

“This legislation will save lives and improve the health of Putnam County residents. Tobacco use causes chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and other forms of cancer. We look forward to County Executive O’Dell’s signing Tobacco 21 into law for a healthier Putnam County,” she said.

In New York State alone, more than half a million people currently have a disease caused by smoking, resulting in about $10.39 billion in health care expenditures annually.

Tobacco 21 has already proved effective in the more than 300 localities nationwide that have enacted this legislation.  In 2005, Needham, MA voted to raise and enforce the minimum tobacco sales age of 21. In 2006, before full enforcement, the town had a youth smoking rate of 13% compared with 15% in the surrounding communities. By 2010, the youth smoking rate in Needham was down to 6.7% while the surrounding communities’ rate only decreased to 12.4%. The percent decline in youth smoking in Needham was nearly triple that of its neighbors.

For more information about the American Heart Association’s You’re the Cure grassroots action network, visit www.yourethecure.org. To find free resources to quit smoking, visit www.heart.org/quitsmoking or the NYS Smoker’s Quitline at https://www.nysmokefree.com/ or 1-866-NY-QUITS.

American Heart Praises Westchester County Passage Of Tobacco 21 Law

The American Heart Association (AHA) said that by prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to anyone under the age of 21, the Westchester County Legislature and County Executive haves acted to save lives and improve the health of county residents. The proposal was passed with a vote of 16-1 Monday evening and signed into law Wednesday by County Executive George Latimer.  “Passage of this bill will help fight chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and all forms of cancer. Westchester is now the 22nd county in New York who has taken this step to save lives,” said Caitlin O’Brien, AHA Government Relations Director. Nearly than 300 localities have passed tobacco 21 laws.

“Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, and tonight’s vote shows that the Westchester County Legislature is committed to the health of its residents,” said O’Brien, “The American Heart Association thanks Westchester County leaders for passing this important measure, and we look forward to improved health for Westchester County residents.”

In the Hudson Valley, Orange, Rockland, Sullivan Counties, Ulster, and the Town of New Castle in Westchester County have passed similar legislation. Nassau County passed the tobacco 21 law Monday night, as well. AHA volunteer You’re the Cure advocates met with New York State legislators on their May 8th Albany Lobby Day to seek support of statewide legislation.

“While county by county measures help, that the patchwork approach doesn’t work and all residents of NY need to be protected. The AHA is seeking a statewide change in the purchasing age of tobacco products,” O’Brien said.

According to the NYS Department of Health, 10,600 youth under 18 become new daily smokers each year, and 73,000 New York State high school students currently smoke.

“A March 2015 report by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies said that if a youth reaches the age of 21 without smoking, the chance of them ever doing so plummets to two percent,” said Icilma V. Fergus, MD, FACC, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Westchester AHA Board President, “These laws will have a huge impact on the health of our residents for generations to come.”

The AHA states that this strategy is already working. In 2005, Needham, MA voted to raise and enforce the minimum tobacco sales age of 21. In 2006, before full enforcement, the town had a youth smoking rate of 13% compared with 15% in the surrounding communities. By 2010, the youth smoking rate in Needham was down to 6.7% while the surrounding communities’ rate only decreased to 12.4%. The percent decline in youth smoking in Needham was nearly triple that of its neighbors.

For more information about the American Heart Association’s You’re the Cure grassroots action network, visit www.yourethecure.org. To find free resources to quit smoking, visit www.heart.org/quitsmoking or the NYS Smoker’s Quitline at https://www.nysmokefree.com/ or 1-866-NY-QUITS.

 

updated June 6, 2018 3:54pm.

Heart Association urges Westchester County to raise age for tobacco, nicotine purchases to 21

Studies show the higher age will reduce the number of first-time, young smokers

This week, Westchester County will vote on raising the the age to purchase cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to 21. The American Heart Association strongly supports this proposal.

 The law would prohibit the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to minors and young adults under the age of 21.

“It’s imperative that we raise the age to purchase tobacco, tobacco and nicotine products to 21,” said Caitlin O’Brien, New York State government relations director for the American Heart Association, “We hope the county executive signs the bill without delay.”

“Studies have shown that raising the tobacco sale age to 21 will significantly reduce the number of teens and young adults who start smoking,” O’Brien said. “It will also reduce smoking-caused deaths.”

Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death in the United States. More than half a million people in New York have a disease caused by smoking, resulting in about $8.17 billion in health care expenditures annually. An estimated 24,500 New Yorkers die of smoking-related deaths each year, according to the AHA.

“New York continuously leads the nation in pursuit of quality tobacco control, like with our high tobacco tax and clean indoor air policies,” O’Brien said. “Westchester has an opportunity to further ensure the good health of its residents by making this deadly habit unavailable to our youth.”

The American Heart Association invites members of the community support voice support of this legislation and other health policies to by joining www.yourethecure.org.

NYS Public Health Groups Call on Governor and Legislature to Raise Tobacco Age of Sale to 21

 

In response to the American Lung Association’s recent “State of Tobacco Control” Report 2017, the American Lung Association, American Heart Association, and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) today gathered with state Sen. Diane Savino (D-Staten Island), and Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal (D-Manhattan), at the State Capitol to call on the state to immediately pass “Tobacco 21” legislation, raising the age of sale of tobacco products to 21.  Both Savino and Rosenthal have introduced legislation to the Senate (S3978) and Assembly (A273).Copy of 18 (1)

“The key to reducing the number of citizens who smoke is to prevent initiation of tobacco use in the first place,” said Senator Diane Savino.  “Delaying children and young adults access to tobacco products will reduce the likelihood that they ever start smoking.  Raising the smoking age to twenty-one will largely remove cigarettes from high schools and will help eliminate a popular source of tobacco for children and young adults.  This legislation will help prevent a generation of New Yorkers from becoming addicted to smoking, and we can ultimately save thousands of lives.”

“Every year tobacco ensnares tens of thousands of young New Yorkers in its death grip,” said Assemblymember Linda B. Rosenthal. “The statistics that surround youth tobacco use though, are not our fate. I am proud to have reintroduced legislation to increase the purchasing age for tobacco products across New York State from 18 to 21. With incredible partners like the American Lung Association, the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association, we have a real chance to protect generations to come.”

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the U.S., and increasing the sales age for tobacco products could have a big impact on youth tobacco use in New York State. According to a 2015 report from the National Academy of Medicine, raising the tobacco age to 21 nationwide would prevent 223,000 deaths among people born between 2000 and 2019, including 50,000 fewer dying from lung cancer, the nation’s leading cancer killer.

“More than 1 in 4 high school students in the state of New York currently use tobacco products,” said Jeff Seyler, President and CEO of the American Lung Association of the Northeast.  “This year’s State of Tobacco Control Report card gave New York State a “D” due to its failure to pass a statewide Tobacco 21 law.  We know that increasing the minimum age of sale for tobacco products to 21 will not only give New York an A grade in this category, but more importantly it will significantly reduce youth tobacco use, long term addiction, and save thousands of lives.”

Every day, nationally, about 2,500 youth under 18 try their first cigarette and 400 kids become regular daily smokers. Two-thirds of 10th grade students and nearly half of 8th grade students say it is easy to get cigarettes. According to a National Academy of Medicine report, smokers age 18-19 years old are a major supplier for younger kids who rely on friends, classmates and peers to buy tobacco products. A comprehensive statewide law raising the age of sale would help reduce the number of high school students who have easy access to tobacco products because they would be less likely to have legal buyers ages 21 and older in their social networks.

Julie Hart, director of New York government relations of ACS CAN said, “Given that about 95 percent of smokers started before the age of 21, it is imperative to take action to help our young New Yorkers. Tobacco 21 is a promising strategy and could stop kids before they begin a deadly tobacco addiction, thereby saving lives and health care costs.”

“Smoking is a leading cause of heart disease, the No. 1 killer of all Americans,” said Dr. Suzie Mookherjee, cardiologist and member of the Founders Affiliate Board of Directors for the American Heart Association. “If a person doesn’t start smoking before they are 21, the chance that they will ever start decreases dramatically. This is a deadly habit that costs New Yorkers $16 billion per year. I urge the state Legislature to protect our youth by passing Tobacco 21 across the state. It is up to us to save young lives.”

“Increasing the tobacco age to 21 will prevent young people from using tobacco, save lives and help make the next generation tobacco-free,” said Kevin O’Flaherty, Northeast Regional Director for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. “This proposal will reduce tobacco use among youth and young adults – age groups when nearly all tobacco use begins and that are heavily targeted by the tobacco industry. It will also help keep tobacco out of high schools, where younger teens often obtain tobacco products from older students.”

“Every day as you leave Burnt Hills High School, will see a group of kids across the road in the church parking lot smoking,” said Conner McClernan, senior at Burnt Hills High School and member of Reality Check, a youth-led movement that helps fight back against tobacco.  “We’re no longer talking about just numbers on a piece of paper or spreadsheet. It is the kids you’ve had pictures of on your mantles since the day they were born.”

While several localities in New York acted to pass local legislation raising the age of sale to 21 in 2016, New York State earned a nearly failing grade of “D” in the Tobacco 21 category of the report for failing to pass comprehensive statewide legislation to keep tobacco out of the hands of young adults. This year’s State of Tobacco Control Report revealed that 28.8% of high school students in the state use at least one tobacco product.  The report also concluded that over $10 billion was spent on health care costs due to smoking in New York and 28,170 New Yorkers lost their lives to tobacco.

By |January 31st, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

American Heart Association Supports Tobacco-21 Bill in Orange County NY

Studies show the higher age will reduce the number of first-time, young smokers

This week, the Orange County Health & Mental Health Committee unanimously passed the “T21” bill proposed by Orange County Legislator James DiSalvo, which would raise the age to purchase cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to 21. The Rules Committee also passed the bill which means the bill will go to the full Legislature for a vote on December 1st. The American Heart Association strongly supports this proposal.18-2

 The law would prohibit the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to minors and young adults under the age of 21.

“It’s imperative that we raise the age to purchase tobacco, tobacco and nicotine products to 21,” said Kristin Salvi, New York State government relations director for the American Heart Association.

“Studies have shown that raising the tobacco sale age to 21 will significantly reduce the number of teens and young adults who start smoking,” Salvi said. “It will also reduce smoking-caused deaths.”

“Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death in the United States. More than half a million people in New York have a disease caused by smoking, resulting in about $8.17 billion in health care expenditures annually. An estimated 24,500 New Yorkers die of smoking-related deaths each year,” said Jonathan Schiller, AHA Heart Walk Chair, and Chief Operating Office at Orange Regional Medical Center.

“New York continuously leads the nation in pursuit of quality tobacco control, like with our high tobacco tax and clean indoor air policies,” Salvi said. “One hundred localities nationwide have raised the age for tobacco sales to 21. Orange County’s smoking rate is still 15%, and the Orange County Legislature has an opportunity to further ensure the good health of its residents by making this deadly habit unavailable to our youth.”

The American Heart Association invites members of the community support voice support of this legislation to create a healthier community in Orange County by calling their legislators before December 1st. Join www.yourethecure.org to sign up for grassroots action alerts.

By |November 17th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments