Walking for Heart Health & Research at Heart Walk

Nearly 1,000 Westchester area residents, including dozens of corporate and community teams, walked at the American Heart Association’s Heart Walk event Saturday at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. They walked for their hearts, and to fund the American Heart Association’s research. This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Heart Walk event nationally. Donations are still being accepted online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

Jennifer Garcia, a 40-year old mom from Peekskill, was recognized as the Survivor Honoree. Garcia survived a heart attack in February and is sharing her story and walking to help raise awareness and fund research to fight heart disease—the number one killer of men and women.

Garcia experienced chest pain and exhaustion during and after a party in February. The next day, she said head was pounding as if someone was hammering at it, and her blood pressure was sky high. She took her mother’s advice to go to the emergency room. It was a lifesaving decision. The doctor there said the diagnosis wasn’t exhaustion or heartburn, as she had thought–it was a heart attack.

Doctors said that her uncontrolled high blood pressure and possibly her birth control medicine were to blame. The American Heart Association cites research shows that birth control pills can increase blood pressure

in some women. It’s more likely to occur if you’re overweight, have had high blood pressure during a previous pregnancy, have a family history of high blood pressure or mild kidney disease. The combination of birth control pills and cigarette use may be especially dangerous for some women.

Many teams walked in honor of survivors or in memory of those lost to heart disease and stroke. Family members and friends on team “Kim’s Heartbeats” walked in memory of Kim Salveggi of Yorktown Heights. She passed away suddenly in March from heart disease. She had served as the Go Red For Women Honoree in 2017 and shared her story of surviving sudden coronary artery dissection.

The Heart Walk featured a healthy kids’ zone with fun activities designed to get kids, and kids at heart, to move more for their health. Many people took advantage of the free blood pressure screening to help identify high blood pressure. High blood pressure accounts for the second largest number of preventable heart disease and stroke deaths, second only to smoking. It’s known as the “silent killer” because often there are no symptoms, despite its role in significantly increasing the risk for heart disease and stroke. Learn more at www.heart.org/highbloodpressure.

 

The Heart Walk is sponsored Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, Fujifilm, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, Westmed Medical Group, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, Zedeker DDS, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, Buzz Creators, and Westchester Magazine.

 

By |September 29th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Westchester Heart Walk This Saturday at Kensico Dam

It’s time to lace up your sneakers for the American Heart Association’s Heart Walk event, this Saturday, September 29th at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Heart Walk event nationally. Many local companies and residents have registered teams to walk for their own hearts, for heart and stroke research.

Register or donate online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org

Jennifer Garcia, a 40-year old mom from Peekskill, will be recognized as the Survivor Honoree. Garcia survived a heart attack in February and is sharing her story and walking to help raise awareness and fund research to fight heart disease—the number one killer of men and women.

Garcia experienced chest pain and exhaustion during and after a party in February. The next day, she said head was pounding as if someone was hammering at it, and her blood pressure was sky high. She took her mother’s advice to go to the emergency room. It was a lifesaving decision. The doctor there said the diagnosis wasn’t exhaustion or heartburn, as she had thought–it was a heart attack.

Doctors said that her uncontrolled high blood pressure and possibly her birth control medicine were to blame. The American Heart Association cites research shows that birth control pills can increase blood pressure in some women. It’s more likely to occur if you’re overweight, have had high blood pressure during a previous pregnancy, have a family history of high blood pressure or mild kidney disease. The combination of birth control pills and cigarette use may be especially dangerous for some women.

“I realized that this was my wake-up call to take my health and body seriously. This was a life-changing experience, and probably just what I needed to realize the importance of taking care of myself,” she said, “I’m walking to help raise awareness, and for my health–and I want to be around for my son,” she said.

Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. In fact, someone dies from cardiovascular disease every 39 seconds. High blood pressure accounts for the second largest number of preventable heart disease and stroke deaths, second only to smoking. It’s known as the “silent killer” because often there are no symptoms, despite its role in significantly increasing the risk for heart disease and stroke. Learn more at www.heart.org/highbloodpressure.

The Heart Walk is sponsored Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, Fujifilm, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, Westmed Medical Group, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, Zedeker DDS, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, Buzz Creators, and Westchester Magazine.

 

Hundreds of Putnam Residents Walk at Heart Walk

 

More than 800 Putnam residents walked at the Putnam Heart Walk at Brewster High School on Sunday, April 22nd. The funds they raised will support heart disease and stroke research, along with the awareness and advocacy programs of the American Heart Association (AHA). Donations are still being accepted online at www.putnamheartwalk.org. Joseph Roberto, president and chief executive officer of PCSB Bank welcomed the crowd and thanked them for their support of the AHA’s lifesaving mission in the Putnam community.  

Kids and adults alike joined in the “Move More” activities at the Heart Walk geared toward getting people active while having fun. An active lifestyle can help heart disease and stroke. The AHA recommends 30 minutes of physical activity daily for adults, and 60 minutes for children.

Diana Mauro from Mahopac was honored as the 2018 Inspirational Honoree for the Putnam Heart Walk. Mauro was born with a congenital heart defect survivor but was only recently diagnosed. Congenital heart defects are structural problems with the heart which are present at birth.

“I hope my story will raise awareness for congenital defects in both children and adults, encourage people to seek medical attention when necessary, and give strength and hope to anyone going through a difficult time,” she said.

At the end of 2016, Mauro began feeling light headed, faint and had low blood pressure. At first, she thought she was dehydrated, but her symptoms persisted. She went to her primary care physician who detected a heart murmur. Further testing by a cardiologist showed she had a rare congenital heart defect known as Scimitar Syndrome, or Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. Three veins from her right lung were connected to the wrong side of the heart. Her body had been compensating for this defect her whole life.

On February 2, 2017, she had open heart surgery to relocate the veins so that the oxygenated blood could circulate correctly. The surgery was successful, requiring no further surgeries.

“I am very grateful and blessed to say that I am a congenital heart defect survivor. I am now left with a 6.5” scar on my chest to remind me of how strong I am, what I have overcome and what is truly important in life,” she said, adding, “To those families going through similar situations, I offer you words that helped me this past year: be strong, be brave, be fearless!”

Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S. The AHA’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Thanks to AHA advocacy, a law was passed NYS to ensure that every baby born receives pulse-oximetry testing, which can help identify heart defects immediately after birth. The AHA also creates guidelines for, and trains parents, caregivers, and medical professionals in infant and child CPR. www.heart.org/CPR.

Research and advanced can save many lives, but more than 80% of heart disease can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like walking 30 minutes daily and eating a healthier diet including more fruits and vegetables. The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s Healthy For Good movement designed to help Americans create lasting change in their health and life, one small step at a time. Learn more at healthyforgood.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by PCSB Bank, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, Putnam Hospital Center, PracticeMax, Lia Honda of Brewster, Stop and Shop, Marshall & Sterling, Park Ford, Unilock, Tompkins Mahopac Bank, VolzAuto, NewYork-Presbyterian and Spirelli Electric, and Always an Angel. Media sponsors are Examiner Media, Mahopac News, Hudson Valley Magazine, and WHUD Radio.

Learn more about congenital heart defects at www.heart.org/CHD. Parents of children with CHD may find support online at the AHA’s Support Network at http://supportnetwork.heart.org/congenital-heart-disease.

#PutnamHeartWalk

By |April 23rd, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Dutchess Residents Walk for Heart

Dozens of teams and hundreds of individuals walked for their hearts and to raise funds at the American Heart Association (AHA) at the annual Dutchess Heart Walk on Saturday, March 24th at Marist College. The Heart Walk event is the American Heart Association’s biggest annual fund raiser and awareness event locally, and it promotes healthier lifestyles as a way to prevent the number one and five killers—heart disease and stroke. Online donations are being accepted at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org

According to the AHA, walking briskly daily and at events like the Heart Walk, can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running. Adults need 30 minutes of physical activity per day, at least 150 minutes of moderate activity per week or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week for heart health. Kids need 60 minutes daily.

Pleasant Valley resident, Alexandra Scimeca was honored as the 2018 Heart Walk Honoree to help raise awareness and funds to fight heart disease, including congenital heart defects like the one she was born with. She had heart surgery the day before her 4th birthday. Thanks to early detection, Alexandra was able to go on with her life. She is now a happy, healthy 13-year old.

“I am thankful for my doctors and what they have given me the chance to have a long, happy and healthy life,” she said. Her Heart Walk team is called “Alex’s Angels.”

While genetics and family history are hard at escape for many, the majority of heart disease is preventable with lifestyle changes. The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s Healthy For Good movement designed to help Americans create lasting change in their health and life, one small step at a time. The approach is simple: Eat smart. Add color. Move more. Be well. Healthy For Good encourages healthier eating, including colorful fruits and vegetables, exercising 30 minutes daily, and focusing on whole body wellness including reducing stress and getting enough sleep. Learn more at healthyforgood.heart.org

Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S. The AHA’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Thanks to AHA advocacy, a 2013 law was passed in New York State to ensure that every baby born receives pulse-oximetry testing, which can help identify heart defects immediately after birth. AHA programs in schools help children to create healthy habits while they’re young. The AHA also creates guidelines for, and trains parents, caregivers, and medical professionals in infant and child CPR. www.heart.org/CPR.

For more information on supporting the American Heart Association’s mission, contact Danielle Schuka, Event Director, at the American Heart Association at (845) 867-5379 or by email Danielle.Schuka@heart.org.

The Heart Walk Presenting Sponsors are Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Northern Dutchess Hospital, The Heart Center, Laerdal, and the David Ping Group. Media sponsors include Townsquare Media, Now 97.7, Southern Dutchess News and Hudson Valley Magazine. #HVheartwalk

 

Participants Moving More at the Westchester Heart Walk

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. Heart disease also kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. But more than 80% of heart disease incidence can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like moving more.  The American Heart Association’s October 1st Heart Walk event at Kensico Dam got Westchester residents moving more to fight heart disease, and the money raised will fund research, and help save lives. 

The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. This year’s event drew nearly 1,200 participants from more than 70 teams registered online. New “Move More” fitness stations were added to get even more activity at the 5K walk event. Kids and adults, and even some cadets volunteering at the event from Company E1 at West Point, tried the Plank Challenge, potato sack races, balloon tennis and more to get moving more. They ended the 5K with a dance celebration on the Kensico Dam Plaza.

“We know sitting is the new smoking and that inactivity is bad for hearts and blood vessels. We want people to move more to keep their hearts healthy to prevent the number one killer—heart disease,” said Jennifer Miller, AHA Heart Walk Senior Regional Director, “Today was a celebration that heart disease and stroke are survivable.”

Heart Walk Chair, Lori Morton from Regeneron in Tarrytown said that many young researchers receive AHA research grants as their first source of funding.

The Konow family of Ossining is grateful for research, early detection and advanced treatments for CHD. Their baby had lifesaving open heart surgery on the day of last year’s Heart Walk. They shared their story to raise awareness and were honored at this year’s event.

Kailey and Ryan Konow showed up for their 20-week prenatal appointment with the anticipation and excitement of any expectant parents. The doctors confirmed they were having a girl—but that she had a rare congenital heart defect. She was given heart tests immediately after birth last August.

Two months later, she got a simple cold and her oxygen levels dipped dangerously low. Mila Rose was put in a coma so her heart would stop working so hard and had emergency heart surgery on the date of last year’s Heart Walk to open her artery. On January 6th, she had the surgery for her full heart repair, and went home after 15 days, her heart fully repaired.

“We are so grateful for the technology and research that allowed the early detection. We’re so grateful for the doctors who continually focused in on her diagnosis and were always ready for her. She will be closely monitored for her cardiology team for the rest of her life, but her future is bright and our hearts are full,” said Konow.

CHD is the most common heart birth defect but it is survivable—the AHA journal Circulation that estimates about 1 million children and 1.4 million adults in the United States were living with a congenital heart defect (CHD) in 2010. The American Heart Association’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Learn more at www.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

Donations are still being accepted online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

Form a Heart Walk Team to Fight Heart Disease

The American Heart Association’s (AHA) Westchester Heart Walk is coming Sunday, October 1st at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. Registration for individuals and teams is open online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org. Many local companies and residents are forming teams to walk in support of the AHA’s mission to save lives from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. For some teams, walking in the Heart Walk is personal.

Gina Palma of “Team Brave Heart” is walking for her 63-year old father, John Palma, who is on the heart transplant list waiting for a new heart.

“We are walking for him and to raise awareness for this rare disease,” she said, “I would give my own heart to Dad if I could.”

She’s doing the next best thing—walking to prevent heart disease while funding lifesaving research. Her father’s heart failed more than three years ago. He felt out of breath doing routine things and it took 20 minutes to recover. He thought it was asthma or pneumonia but wa eventually diagnosed with cardiac amyloidosis—a rare form of heart disease where an abnormal amyloid liver protein deposits itself in the walls of the heart, making them stiff and unable to pump normally. There is no cure, but treatments can manage the symptoms. Ultimately, his heart failed.

“Blood tests showed my kidney functions were getting worse and my breathing was worsening. Heart transplant was mentioned a while ago. I went through a barrage of tests and interviews. Now I am on the list.”

“I was near retirement, then I got hit with this. This wasn’t self-inflicted. A rare disease comes out of nowhere and you have deal with it,” he said.

Though he knows the wait is long and often an emotional rollercoaster, he feels lucky because his diagnosis was swift, his treatments are extending his life, and he has support of good friends and family. He hopes by sharing his story he will help raise awareness and remind people to get annual checkups. And he wants more funding for research.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. In fact, someone dies from CVD every 39 seconds. The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. Funds raised at the Heart Walk will support research to help prevent and treat heart disease, stroke, and pediatric heart disease. The American Heart Association’s funding for research is second only to the federal government. American Heart Association-funded research has led to the discovery and development of many treatments and procedures that are now widely utilized to help save lives. They include heart bypass surgery, CPR, clot-busting drugs, stents, cardiac catheterization, and heart transplantation. Learn more at www.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

Form a team and register online to walk in the Westchester Heart Walk! www.westchesterheartwalk.org 

By |September 12th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Volunteer Chair Announced for Heart Walk Event

We are proud to announce that D. Douglas Miller, M.D., C.M., M.B.A., will serve as Executive Champion the Westchester Heart Walk event, set for Sunday, October 2nd at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $343,500 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event.dr miller headshot

Miller will appeal to local businesses and community leaders to sponsor and form teams to join the Heart Walk to support the AHA’s mission to build healthier lives free from cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

Heart disease costs employers more than $3 billion annually, according to the AHA.

“It just makes good sense for businesses to support this cause, as well as encourage employees to pursue a heart healthy lifestyle in the workplace,” he said.

Miller is the Dean of the School of Medicine at New York Medical College in Valhalla. Prior to his role at NYMC, he served as Dean of Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, as well as Chair of the Health Sciences Council at the University of Alberta.

An internationally recognized cardiologist and clinician-scientist, Dr. Miller has served as a leader in academic medicine and chief academic/executive officer for more than 25 years. His work has resulted in more than 110 peer-reviewed papers and multiple patents, and he serves on the editorial boards of many renowned influential journals.

The Heart Walk is a celebration of year-round efforts by local organizations to create a “culture of health” in the workplace. The American Heart Association encourages worksites to support healthier behaviors at work through the AHA’s Workplace Health Solutions program. Heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., and physical inactivity doubles the risk. Information is online at www.heart.org/workplacewellness.

Companies interested in supporting the Heart Walk with sponsorship or teams should call Jennifer Miller at 203- 295-2943 or email Jennifer.miller@heart.org. To register online, please visit www.westchesterhearheartwalk.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by New York Medical College, White Plains Hospital, WMC Health | Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, Northern Westchester Hospital/Northwell Health, Stop & Shop and Fuji Film. Media sponsors include News 12 Westchester, Buzz Creators, and Westchester Magazine.

nymedicalcollege

By |September 20th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Nominate Someone for a Lifestyle Change Award

 

Do you know someone whose health has greatly improved as a result of making long-term healthy lifestyle changes? Have you lost a lot of weight in the past year, started living healthier or know someone who has? The American Heart Association invites you to nominate yourself or a healthy friend for the Lifestyle Change Award.

The Westchester County Region of the American Heart Association is accepting nominations for their Lifestyle Change Award, sponsored locally by Merit Direct. The award honors individuals who have made positive changes to improve their quality of life and overall health.

Ideal candidates are people who have taken control of their health in areas of diet, exercise or tobacco cessation and seen positive results in weight, BMI, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar. Winners will be recognized at the association’s Heart Walk on October 4th at Kensico Dam, Valhalla, NY.

To nominate an individual for a Lifestyle Change Award download the form at www.westchesterheartwalk.org or by calling Jennifer Gelick at 203-295-2943. Application deadline is September 28th.

Heart Walk registration is open online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org. Corporate, community and family teams are welcome to register to walk for their own heart health and the funds raised will help other hearts in our community.

Achieving a heart healthy lifestyle starts with knowing your personal heart score, according to the AHA. To get a free measurement of your personal heart health, the American Heart AIMG_2376ssociation recommends focusing on seven heart health factors known as “Life’s Simple 7” to achieve ideal health. To find out where you stand on Life’s Simple 7 and to get an individualized action plan for improving your heart score, visit www.MyLifeCheck.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Signature and Regional Chain of Survival Sponsor, Westchester Medical Center, National Walking Day sponsor New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, White Plains Hospital, Fuji Film, Merit Direct and Stop & Shop, and media sponsors Examiner Media, Westchester Magazine and 107.1 The Peak.

For more information about the Heart Walk or to start a team, please email jennifer.gelick@heart.org or call 203-295-2943 To sign up your team online, visit www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

 

By |September 2nd, 2015|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments