American Heart Praises Westchester County Passage Of Tobacco 21 Law

The American Heart Association (AHA) said that by prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to anyone under the age of 21, the Westchester County Legislature and County Executive haves acted to save lives and improve the health of county residents. The proposal was passed with a vote of 16-1 Monday evening and signed into law Wednesday by County Executive George Latimer.  “Passage of this bill will help fight chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and all forms of cancer. Westchester is now the 22nd county in New York who has taken this step to save lives,” said Caitlin O’Brien, AHA Government Relations Director. Nearly than 300 localities have passed tobacco 21 laws.

“Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, and tonight’s vote shows that the Westchester County Legislature is committed to the health of its residents,” said O’Brien, “The American Heart Association thanks Westchester County leaders for passing this important measure, and we look forward to improved health for Westchester County residents.”

In the Hudson Valley, Orange, Rockland, Sullivan Counties, Ulster, and the Town of New Castle in Westchester County have passed similar legislation. Nassau County passed the tobacco 21 law Monday night, as well. AHA volunteer You’re the Cure advocates met with New York State legislators on their May 8th Albany Lobby Day to seek support of statewide legislation.

“While county by county measures help, that the patchwork approach doesn’t work and all residents of NY need to be protected. The AHA is seeking a statewide change in the purchasing age of tobacco products,” O’Brien said.

According to the NYS Department of Health, 10,600 youth under 18 become new daily smokers each year, and 73,000 New York State high school students currently smoke.

“A March 2015 report by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies said that if a youth reaches the age of 21 without smoking, the chance of them ever doing so plummets to two percent,” said Icilma V. Fergus, MD, FACC, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Westchester AHA Board President, “These laws will have a huge impact on the health of our residents for generations to come.”

The AHA states that this strategy is already working. In 2005, Needham, MA voted to raise and enforce the minimum tobacco sales age of 21. In 2006, before full enforcement, the town had a youth smoking rate of 13% compared with 15% in the surrounding communities. By 2010, the youth smoking rate in Needham was down to 6.7% while the surrounding communities’ rate only decreased to 12.4%. The percent decline in youth smoking in Needham was nearly triple that of its neighbors.

For more information about the American Heart Association’s You’re the Cure grassroots action network, visit www.yourethecure.org. To find free resources to quit smoking, visit www.heart.org/quitsmoking or the NYS Smoker’s Quitline at https://www.nysmokefree.com/ or 1-866-NY-QUITS.

 

updated June 6, 2018 3:54pm.

Heart Association urges Westchester County to raise age for tobacco, nicotine purchases to 21

Studies show the higher age will reduce the number of first-time, young smokers

This week, Westchester County will vote on raising the the age to purchase cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to 21. The American Heart Association strongly supports this proposal.

 The law would prohibit the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to minors and young adults under the age of 21.

“It’s imperative that we raise the age to purchase tobacco, tobacco and nicotine products to 21,” said Caitlin O’Brien, New York State government relations director for the American Heart Association, “We hope the county executive signs the bill without delay.”

“Studies have shown that raising the tobacco sale age to 21 will significantly reduce the number of teens and young adults who start smoking,” O’Brien said. “It will also reduce smoking-caused deaths.”

Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death in the United States. More than half a million people in New York have a disease caused by smoking, resulting in about $8.17 billion in health care expenditures annually. An estimated 24,500 New Yorkers die of smoking-related deaths each year, according to the AHA.

“New York continuously leads the nation in pursuit of quality tobacco control, like with our high tobacco tax and clean indoor air policies,” O’Brien said. “Westchester has an opportunity to further ensure the good health of its residents by making this deadly habit unavailable to our youth.”

The American Heart Association invites members of the community support voice support of this legislation and other health policies to by joining www.yourethecure.org.

Hundreds of Putnam Residents Walk at Heart Walk

 

More than 800 Putnam residents walked at the Putnam Heart Walk at Brewster High School on Sunday, April 22nd. The funds they raised will support heart disease and stroke research, along with the awareness and advocacy programs of the American Heart Association (AHA). Donations are still being accepted online at www.putnamheartwalk.org. Joseph Roberto, president and chief executive officer of PCSB Bank welcomed the crowd and thanked them for their support of the AHA’s lifesaving mission in the Putnam community.  

Kids and adults alike joined in the “Move More” activities at the Heart Walk geared toward getting people active while having fun. An active lifestyle can help heart disease and stroke. The AHA recommends 30 minutes of physical activity daily for adults, and 60 minutes for children.

Diana Mauro from Mahopac was honored as the 2018 Inspirational Honoree for the Putnam Heart Walk. Mauro was born with a congenital heart defect survivor but was only recently diagnosed. Congenital heart defects are structural problems with the heart which are present at birth.

“I hope my story will raise awareness for congenital defects in both children and adults, encourage people to seek medical attention when necessary, and give strength and hope to anyone going through a difficult time,” she said.

At the end of 2016, Mauro began feeling light headed, faint and had low blood pressure. At first, she thought she was dehydrated, but her symptoms persisted. She went to her primary care physician who detected a heart murmur. Further testing by a cardiologist showed she had a rare congenital heart defect known as Scimitar Syndrome, or Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. Three veins from her right lung were connected to the wrong side of the heart. Her body had been compensating for this defect her whole life.

On February 2, 2017, she had open heart surgery to relocate the veins so that the oxygenated blood could circulate correctly. The surgery was successful, requiring no further surgeries.

“I am very grateful and blessed to say that I am a congenital heart defect survivor. I am now left with a 6.5” scar on my chest to remind me of how strong I am, what I have overcome and what is truly important in life,” she said, adding, “To those families going through similar situations, I offer you words that helped me this past year: be strong, be brave, be fearless!”

Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S. The AHA’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Thanks to AHA advocacy, a law was passed NYS to ensure that every baby born receives pulse-oximetry testing, which can help identify heart defects immediately after birth. The AHA also creates guidelines for, and trains parents, caregivers, and medical professionals in infant and child CPR. www.heart.org/CPR.

Research and advanced can save many lives, but more than 80% of heart disease can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like walking 30 minutes daily and eating a healthier diet including more fruits and vegetables. The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s Healthy For Good movement designed to help Americans create lasting change in their health and life, one small step at a time. Learn more at healthyforgood.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by PCSB Bank, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, Putnam Hospital Center, PracticeMax, Lia Honda of Brewster, Stop and Shop, Marshall & Sterling, Park Ford, Unilock, Tompkins Mahopac Bank, VolzAuto, NewYork-Presbyterian and Spirelli Electric, and Always an Angel. Media sponsors are Examiner Media, Mahopac News, Hudson Valley Magazine, and WHUD Radio.

Learn more about congenital heart defects at www.heart.org/CHD. Parents of children with CHD may find support online at the AHA’s Support Network at http://supportnetwork.heart.org/congenital-heart-disease.

#PutnamHeartWalk

By |April 23rd, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Heart Advocacy Update from Albany

Update from Caitlin O’Brien, NYS American Heart Association Government Relations Director

With New York State finalizing the State budget this past weekend, the Heart Association scored some great public health wins. With the Governor threatening to cut millions of dollars in funding to crucial public health programs, AHA staff and advocates worked hard to make sure this didn’t come to fruition. After months of email, calls, and meetings with elected officials, our hard work paid off and the cuts were rejected in the final budget. This means programs like the Hypertension Program, aimed at reducing rates of heart disease and stroke, will continue to get $692,000 in critical funding. Additionally, the Obesity/Diabetes Prevention Program received $5.9 million, which will help people in communities across the State live healthier lives. Lastly, our elected officials held steady funding aimed at tobacco cessation in the Tobacco Control Program.

As we look toward the rest of the legislative session, we have plenty of policy priorities to support. Here is what we will be focusing on:

  • Raising the minimum legal sales age of tobacco products to 21 through the passage of Tobacco 21.
  • Prohibiting flavored tobacco products which the tobacco industry targets to youth
  • Instituting healthy vending machines throughout state owned properties
  • Offering healthier, non-sugary beverages in children’s meals at restaurants

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

  • Join us on May 8 for Lobby Day at the New York State Capitol to push for the passage of Tobacco 21. Email me at Obrien@heart.org to learn more or sign up.
  • Join You’re the Cure online at www.yourethecure.org 
  • Take action when you get an email from You’re the Cure! With one click, you can let your legislator know that you support the American Heart Association’s initiatives.
By |April 4th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Participants Moving More at the Westchester Heart Walk

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. Heart disease also kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. But more than 80% of heart disease incidence can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like moving more.  The American Heart Association’s October 1st Heart Walk event at Kensico Dam got Westchester residents moving more to fight heart disease, and the money raised will fund research, and help save lives. 

The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. This year’s event drew nearly 1,200 participants from more than 70 teams registered online. New “Move More” fitness stations were added to get even more activity at the 5K walk event. Kids and adults, and even some cadets volunteering at the event from Company E1 at West Point, tried the Plank Challenge, potato sack races, balloon tennis and more to get moving more. They ended the 5K with a dance celebration on the Kensico Dam Plaza.

“We know sitting is the new smoking and that inactivity is bad for hearts and blood vessels. We want people to move more to keep their hearts healthy to prevent the number one killer—heart disease,” said Jennifer Miller, AHA Heart Walk Senior Regional Director, “Today was a celebration that heart disease and stroke are survivable.”

Heart Walk Chair, Lori Morton from Regeneron in Tarrytown said that many young researchers receive AHA research grants as their first source of funding.

The Konow family of Ossining is grateful for research, early detection and advanced treatments for CHD. Their baby had lifesaving open heart surgery on the day of last year’s Heart Walk. They shared their story to raise awareness and were honored at this year’s event.

Kailey and Ryan Konow showed up for their 20-week prenatal appointment with the anticipation and excitement of any expectant parents. The doctors confirmed they were having a girl—but that she had a rare congenital heart defect. She was given heart tests immediately after birth last August.

Two months later, she got a simple cold and her oxygen levels dipped dangerously low. Mila Rose was put in a coma so her heart would stop working so hard and had emergency heart surgery on the date of last year’s Heart Walk to open her artery. On January 6th, she had the surgery for her full heart repair, and went home after 15 days, her heart fully repaired.

“We are so grateful for the technology and research that allowed the early detection. We’re so grateful for the doctors who continually focused in on her diagnosis and were always ready for her. She will be closely monitored for her cardiology team for the rest of her life, but her future is bright and our hearts are full,” said Konow.

CHD is the most common heart birth defect but it is survivable—the AHA journal Circulation that estimates about 1 million children and 1.4 million adults in the United States were living with a congenital heart defect (CHD) in 2010. The American Heart Association’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Learn more at www.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

Donations are still being accepted online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

“Men Go Red For Women” Event Supports Women’s Heart Health

The Dutchess-Ulster American Heart Association’s “Men Go Red For Women” event at the Marist Boathouse at on Tuesday, June 6th was a great success! Thank you to everyone who attended and supported Go Red For Women!

Men Go Red For Women is a dynamic, committed group of men who are raising awareness, and funds, to fight heart disease, the number one killer of women and men. They’re standing behind the women they care about —wives, mothers, daughters, sisters and friends —while influencing and inspiring communities to support the life-saving work of the Go Red For Women movement.

The event was co-chaired by Craig Irwin and Joshua Mackey, and sponsored by their companies, Merrill Lynch in Poughkeepsie, and Mackey Butts & Wise LLP in Millbrook.

Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. Heart disease causes one in three women’s deaths each year, killing approximately one woman every minute. The AHA states that women are less likely to call 9-1-1 for themselves when experiencing symptoms of a heart attack than they are for someone else. Women comprise only 24 percent of participants in all heart-related studies. An estimated 43 million women in the U.S. are affected by heart disease and ninety percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease. To learn more, visit www.GoRedForWomen.org.

This Men Go Red event featured networking, light fare, beer and wine, provided by Arlington Wines & Liquors, and Half Time in Poughkeepsie. The Men Go Red group will have exclusive events throughout the year and members will receive tickets to the annual Go Red For Women Luncheon set for November 9, 2017 at the Grandview.

For information about joining Men Go Red, please contact Danielle Schuka, Go Red Corporate Events Director at 845-867-5379 or by email at Danielle.schuka@heart.org.

Go Red For Women is sponsored nationally by Macy’s and CVS, and locally by The Heart Center, Vassar Brothers Hospital, Northern Dutchess Hospital, Central Hudson, Gold’s Gym, Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel, The Grandview and Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union.

Apply Today for Dutchess-Ulster BetterU Challenge

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., taking the life of one in three women – almost one woman every minute. However, research shows that 80 percent of cardiac events in women are preventable and linked to poor choices involving diet, exercise and smoking. That’s why the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women® is helping women speak up for their hearts and change this statistic by offering a free 12-week makeover, Go Red BetterU.

Download the application here.

 Powered by the science of the American Heart Association, Go Red BetterU provides guidance to help women transform their overall health through small, simple choices. Go Red BetterU gives women an opportunity to achieve a noticeably better state of well-being and heart health in just 12 weeks. Choose to be a BetterU at GoRedForWomen.org.

 Locally, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation is the proud sponsor of the BetterU Challenge, a 12-week lifestyle change program. Twelve lucky participants will be selected to participate in the 12-week challenge. Each participant will receive:

• Baseline & 12-week medical readings by Health Quest Medical Practice

• 3-month membership to Gold’s Gym – LaGrange

• Personal training with Gold’s Gym

• Nutrition advice from a medical professional

• Group support from other BetterU participants

• The power, resources and tools of GoRedForWomen.org.

Elizabeth Donahue — 2014-15 BetterU Challenger!

 Participants will be photographed before and after the 12-weeks, interviewed by media, asked to write about their experiences on the participant BetterU Blog, and help us celebrate the program by attending as our guests at the Go Red for Women Luncheon on November 9, 2017.

With Go Red BetterU, you’ll learn smart strategies and gain new information on improving and maintaining your health, along with the encouragement and advice of local coaches. Each week will focus on a different area to follow for a complete heart makeover. Live longer and stronger by taking 12 weeks to invest in your health!

Interested in becoming a participant? Read and complete the application by June 26th. Download the application here.

For more information, visit our website at dutchessulstergored.heart.org or call 845-867-5379.

Sponsored by Central Hudson, Gold’s Gym, Health Quest Medical Practice, the Poughkeepsie Journal, and Q92.1FM.

 

Teach Kids to Leave Healthy Treats for Santa and His Reindeer

The big night is almost here! Santa and his elves at the North Pole are getting ready for the big night–Christmas Eve! And children all around the world are doing their very best to be good, not fight with their siblings, and clean up their rooms to prove they’re worthy of receiving the gifts on their Christmas lists. As a sign of gratitude and profound love for that jolly, old elf, millions of plates of cookies and glasses of milk will be left by the tree for Santa.

According to the History Channel, the tradition of leaving cookies and milk in the U.S. dates back to the 1930’s when parents, struggling with rations and the Great Depression, aimed to demonstrate gratitude to their children to be thankful for all they would receive. When you give, you receive. Say thanks. Be grateful. Share what you have–all timeless lessons.healthy-santa

But the roots of leaving gifts for Santa and his reindeer go as far back as Norse mythology when children would leave gifts for Odin (yes, comic book fans, that Odin) and his eight-legged horse, Sleipner, to entice them to leave gifts in the midwinter Yule celebration.

All these years later, cookies and milk are the go-to treat for Santa. It doesn’t take a mathematician to understand why Santa’s belt gets a wee bit tight around the holidays! That’s a lot of cookies!

This holiday season, let’s take a health lesson from the treat plate next to Santa’s that’s left for his reindeer, and add color and a few more veggies to Santa’s plate! It’s a great opportunity to show kids the importance of healthy snacks, for themselves, and for people they love, like Santa.

It’s a great opportunity for a lesson in giving and giving thoughtfully with an eye on health.

What are some healthy treats kids can make and leave for Santa’s to energize him on his late night journey? Peanut butter and all-fruit jam on whole wheat bread or crackers! Almond butter on whole
grain graham crackers! Turkey and spinach roll-ups in a whole what wrap! Happy face orange slices! A bunch of grapes and a banana! Apple slices with yogurt! A smoothie with fruit, veggies and low-fat milk or yogurt! Or a fancy yogurt parfait with granola and berries! And, of course, for his reindeer, healthy carrots, celery and broccoli!

This Christmas, give the gift of health for you, your children…and, of course, Santa. May he live a long and healthy life!

Happy Holidays from the American Heart Association! Get more tips for healthier living at www.heart.org/healthyliving 

apple-heartshealthy-snackshappy-holiday-heart

 

 

 

By |December 15th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

American Heart Association Supports Tobacco-21 Bill in Orange County NY

Studies show the higher age will reduce the number of first-time, young smokers

This week, the Orange County Health & Mental Health Committee unanimously passed the “T21” bill proposed by Orange County Legislator James DiSalvo, which would raise the age to purchase cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to 21. The Rules Committee also passed the bill which means the bill will go to the full Legislature for a vote on December 1st. The American Heart Association strongly supports this proposal.18-2

 The law would prohibit the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, liquid nicotine, or electronic cigarettes to minors and young adults under the age of 21.

“It’s imperative that we raise the age to purchase tobacco, tobacco and nicotine products to 21,” said Kristin Salvi, New York State government relations director for the American Heart Association.

“Studies have shown that raising the tobacco sale age to 21 will significantly reduce the number of teens and young adults who start smoking,” Salvi said. “It will also reduce smoking-caused deaths.”

“Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death in the United States. More than half a million people in New York have a disease caused by smoking, resulting in about $8.17 billion in health care expenditures annually. An estimated 24,500 New Yorkers die of smoking-related deaths each year,” said Jonathan Schiller, AHA Heart Walk Chair, and Chief Operating Office at Orange Regional Medical Center.

“New York continuously leads the nation in pursuit of quality tobacco control, like with our high tobacco tax and clean indoor air policies,” Salvi said. “One hundred localities nationwide have raised the age for tobacco sales to 21. Orange County’s smoking rate is still 15%, and the Orange County Legislature has an opportunity to further ensure the good health of its residents by making this deadly habit unavailable to our youth.”

The American Heart Association invites members of the community support voice support of this legislation to create a healthier community in Orange County by calling their legislators before December 1st. Join www.yourethecure.org to sign up for grassroots action alerts.

By |November 17th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Tips for a Healthier Holiday Season from American Heart Association

Free Healthy Holiday Eating Guide Available

 As we prepare to gather with family and friends this holiday season, the American Heart Association (AHA) reminds us that we can make smart recipe substitutions to keep our holiday meals—and the people we love—healthier. Over-indulging in traditional holiday foods can add extra pounds to our waistlines, and increase our risk for obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

More than 60% of Americans are overweight or obese, according to the AHA, so getting to and maintaining a healthy weight is important during the holidays and year round. The AHA recommends making small buteat-mindfully impactful lifestyle changes to prevent heart disease and stroke, the nation’s number one and four killers. Studies show that more than 80% of heart disease can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like quitting smoking, exercising 30 minutes most days of the week and eating healthier.

The American Heart Association says the first step is to determine your daily calorie intake with an app or online calculator, then adjust your daily calories into the healthy range. A good place to start is by eating more fruits and vegetables which are low in calories and high in nutrition.

“Many of the traditional foods served during the holidays can be healthy – the trick is to not load on the butter, sodium and sugar,” said Roufia Payman, DT, CDN, supervisor of Outpatient Nutrition Counseling, and diabetes lifestyle coach at Northern Dutchess Hospital. “Add color and nutrition to your plate with seasonal squash, roasted vegetables and fruit-based desserts.”

All of the holiday parties and dinners can throw off your healthy lifestyle goals. The American Heart holiday-healthy-eating-guide-2016-cover-imageAssociation is offering its annual Holiday Healthy Eating Guide to help people navigate the holiday season in a healthy way. The 13-page free guide has tips, recipes and resources to help maintain a healthy lifestyle during the busy holiday season. The guide is available free online at www.bit.ly/AHAHolidayGuide.

Party with a healthy plan in place!
The AHA recommends healthy portions, limiting the empty calories in alcohol drinks and filling up on healthier fruits and vegetables first, before the less healthy options. Keep dessert temptations to small samples of your favorites instead of full servings, and eat mindfully to enjoy every morsel. Don’t stand near the party buffet and avoid mindless nibbling.

Plate-Up Health First
Be sure to pack your holiday meals with lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, fish, skinless poultry, and plant-based side dishes and main courses.

Swap-In Healthier Choices
Substitute fat-free and low-fat dairy products for the higher fat versions, like Greek yogurt for sour cream. Use lower sodium versions of foods like broth, canned vegetables and sauces. Use whole-grain breads and pastas instead of white flour ones. Cook with unsaturated, healthier fats, and non-tropical oils. Eliminate trans fats and partially hydrogenated oils. If you choose red meats, select the leanest cuts. When it comes to poultry, light meat is leaner than dark. A serving size of meat is 3 oz., about the size of a deck of cards.

Avoid the empty calories of sugar-sweetened beverages, particularly if you are going to indulge in small samples of desserts. Here are some more tips!

More Cooking Tips

  • Use vegetable oils such as olive oil instead of butter.
  • Use herbs and spices, like rosemary and cloves, to flavor dishes instead of butter and salt.
  • Bake, grill or steam vegetables instead of frying.
  • Instead of whole milk or heavy cream, substitute low-fat or fat-free/skim milk.

Baking Swaps

  • Instead of butter, substitute equal parts cinnamon-flavored, no-sugar-added applesauce.
  • Instead of sugar, use a lower-calorie sugar substitute.
  • Instead of whole or heavy cream, substitute low-fat or skim milk.
  • Instead of using only white flour, use half white and half whole-wheat flour.
  • Instead of adding chocolate chips or candies, use dried fruit, like cranberries or cherries.
  • Use extracts like vanilla, almond and peppermint to add flavor, instead of sugar or butter.

Healthier Beverages

  • Instead of alcohol in mixed drinks, use club soda.
  • Instead of adding sugar to mixed drinks, mix 100-percent juice with water or use freshly squeezed juice, like lime.
  • Instead of using heavy cream or whole milk in dairy-based drinks, use low-fat or skim milk.
  • Instead of using sugar to sweeten cider, use spices and fruit, like cinnamon, cloves and cranberries.

Of course, exercise is critical to weight management and overall health. The AHA recommends getting 30 minutes of vigorous exercise on most days of the week. Eating more? Walk more! A brisk walk before or after meals can help burn those extra calories.

To find more simple ways you and your family can eat healthy, visit www.heart.org/healthyeating.

By |November 16th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , |0 Comments