Participants Moving More at the Westchester Heart Walk

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. Heart disease also kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. But more than 80% of heart disease incidence can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes like moving more.  The American Heart Association’s October 1st Heart Walk event at Kensico Dam got Westchester residents moving more to fight heart disease, and the money raised will fund research, and help save lives. 

The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. This year’s event drew nearly 1,200 participants from more than 70 teams registered online. New “Move More” fitness stations were added to get even more activity at the 5K walk event. Kids and adults, and even some cadets volunteering at the event from Company E1 at West Point, tried the Plank Challenge, potato sack races, balloon tennis and more to get moving more. They ended the 5K with a dance celebration on the Kensico Dam Plaza.

“We know sitting is the new smoking and that inactivity is bad for hearts and blood vessels. We want people to move more to keep their hearts healthy to prevent the number one killer—heart disease,” said Jennifer Miller, AHA Heart Walk Senior Regional Director, “Today was a celebration that heart disease and stroke are survivable.”

Heart Walk Chair, Lori Morton from Regeneron in Tarrytown said that many young researchers receive AHA research grants as their first source of funding.

The Konow family of Ossining is grateful for research, early detection and advanced treatments for CHD. Their baby had lifesaving open heart surgery on the day of last year’s Heart Walk. They shared their story to raise awareness and were honored at this year’s event.

Kailey and Ryan Konow showed up for their 20-week prenatal appointment with the anticipation and excitement of any expectant parents. The doctors confirmed they were having a girl—but that she had a rare congenital heart defect. She was given heart tests immediately after birth last August.

Two months later, she got a simple cold and her oxygen levels dipped dangerously low. Mila Rose was put in a coma so her heart would stop working so hard and had emergency heart surgery on the date of last year’s Heart Walk to open her artery. On January 6th, she had the surgery for her full heart repair, and went home after 15 days, her heart fully repaired.

“We are so grateful for the technology and research that allowed the early detection. We’re so grateful for the doctors who continually focused in on her diagnosis and were always ready for her. She will be closely monitored for her cardiology team for the rest of her life, but her future is bright and our hearts are full,” said Konow.

CHD is the most common heart birth defect but it is survivable—the AHA journal Circulation that estimates about 1 million children and 1.4 million adults in the United States were living with a congenital heart defect (CHD) in 2010. The American Heart Association’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Learn more at www.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

Donations are still being accepted online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

Form a Heart Walk Team to Fight Heart Disease

The American Heart Association’s (AHA) Westchester Heart Walk is coming Sunday, October 1st at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. Registration for individuals and teams is open online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org. Many local companies and residents are forming teams to walk in support of the AHA’s mission to save lives from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. For some teams, walking in the Heart Walk is personal.

Gina Palma of “Team Brave Heart” is walking for her 63-year old father, John Palma, who is on the heart transplant list waiting for a new heart.

“We are walking for him and to raise awareness for this rare disease,” she said, “I would give my own heart to Dad if I could.”

She’s doing the next best thing—walking to prevent heart disease while funding lifesaving research. Her father’s heart failed more than three years ago. He felt out of breath doing routine things and it took 20 minutes to recover. He thought it was asthma or pneumonia but wa eventually diagnosed with cardiac amyloidosis—a rare form of heart disease where an abnormal amyloid liver protein deposits itself in the walls of the heart, making them stiff and unable to pump normally. There is no cure, but treatments can manage the symptoms. Ultimately, his heart failed.

“Blood tests showed my kidney functions were getting worse and my breathing was worsening. Heart transplant was mentioned a while ago. I went through a barrage of tests and interviews. Now I am on the list.”

“I was near retirement, then I got hit with this. This wasn’t self-inflicted. A rare disease comes out of nowhere and you have deal with it,” he said.

Though he knows the wait is long and often an emotional rollercoaster, he feels lucky because his diagnosis was swift, his treatments are extending his life, and he has support of good friends and family. He hopes by sharing his story he will help raise awareness and remind people to get annual checkups. And he wants more funding for research.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. In fact, someone dies from CVD every 39 seconds. The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. Funds raised at the Heart Walk will support research to help prevent and treat heart disease, stroke, and pediatric heart disease. The American Heart Association’s funding for research is second only to the federal government. American Heart Association-funded research has led to the discovery and development of many treatments and procedures that are now widely utilized to help save lives. They include heart bypass surgery, CPR, clot-busting drugs, stents, cardiac catheterization, and heart transplantation. Learn more at www.heart.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

Form a team and register online to walk in the Westchester Heart Walk! www.westchesterheartwalk.org 

By |September 12th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Heart Disease Affects Children, Too–Walk for Healthy Hearts

Heart Birth Defects Are #1 Birth Defect, but Survivable

Mila Rose on her 1st Birthday!

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the No. 1 killer of all Americans. In fact, someone dies from CVD every 39 seconds. Heart disease also kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. Congenital heart defects are the most common cause of infant death from birth defects. The American Heart Association invites the public to join the October 1st Heart Walk event at Kensico Dam to join the fight against heart disease, fund research, and help save lives. Registration is open online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $400,000 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event. Funds raised at the Heart Walk will support research to help prevent and treat heart disease, stroke, and pediatric heart disease.

Congenital heart defects, or CHD, affect nearly 1% of―or about 40,000―births per year in the United States. Early detection, advances in science and treatments of congenital heart defects help save lives. The Konow family of Ossining is grateful for early detection and advanced treatments for CHD. Their baby had lifesaving open heart surgery on the day of last year’s Heart Walk. They are sharing their story to raise awareness and will be honored at this year’s event.

Kailey and Ryan Konow showed up for their 20-week prenatal appointment with the anticipation and excitement of any expectant parents. The doctors confirmed they were having a girl—but that she had a rare congenital heart defect. Further tests confirmed her diagnosis: a double outlet right ventricle VSD, or ventricular septal defect (holes in the heart), and pulmonary stenosis, or narrowing of the heart artery. The doctors said she would need open heart surgery–it was just a matter of when.

Because of early detection, the neonatal intensive care unit team was ready and waiting to care for Mila Rose when she was born on August 3, 2016.

“My husband and I got to hold her for only a couple of minutes before she was whisked away to begin her tests,” said Mila Rose’s mother, Kailey, “After five days in intensive care, we took her home to get her strong for her impending surgery.”

After two months, they noticed the soft spot on her head was sunken, and took her to the pediatrician. By the time they arrived, Mila Rose’s eyes, mouth and lips were blue. Her oxygen levels were dangerously low and she was sent to the emergency room. A simple common cold caused her fragile heart to work overtime. Three days later, she was released, but within the week, the same symptoms returned, but worse.

“It was the scariest event yet. Her oxygen levels dipped and they needed to intubate her with a breathing tube and put her in a coma so her heart would stop working so hard,” she said.

Mila Rose had emergency heart surgery to have a shunt placed in her narrowed artery, but the other defect would require additional surgery in the future. Post-surgery, she was kept isolated at home to minimize the risk of illness. On January 6th, she had the surgery for her full heart repair, and went home after 15 days, her heart fully repaired.

“At first, we couldn’t believe this was happening to us. Why did they have to find something? Now we are so grateful for the technology and research that allowed the early detection. We’re so grateful for the doctors who continually focused in on her diagnosis and were always ready for her. She will be closely monitored for her cardiology team for the rest of her life, but her future is bright and our hearts are full,” said Konow.

CHD is the most common heart birth defect but it is survivable—the AHA journal Circulation that estimates about 1 million children and 1.4 million adults in the United States were living with a congenital heart defect (CHD) in 2010. The American Heart Association’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Learn more at www.heart.org. Money raised at events like the Heart Walk help fund research.

The Heart Walk is sponsored by White Plains Hospital, WMC Health/Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Fujifilm, Dr. Patrick W. Thomas and Mrs. Johanna D. Thomas, New York Presbyterian, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, New York Medical College, Stop & Shop, Examiner Media, The Peak, Buzz Creators, News 12 Westchester, and Westchester Magazine.

 

Women Selected for 7th BetterU Heart Health Challenge

Seated L to R: Grace Gay, Abby Paul, Gina Bambinelli, Michelle DeMild, Lisa Morris…Standing L to R: Diane Labenski, Kim Kenyon (Gold’s Gym), Amanda Balint, Robin Commerford, Allison Morris, Flossie Burke, MaryK Jones, Denise Doring VanBuren (Central Hudson).

The Dutchess-Ulster American Heart Association announced the 12 women selected for the7th Annual BetterU Makeover Challenge at a kick-off event at Gold’s Gym in LaGrange Friday. Their stories will be featured in blogs and stories in the Poughkeepsie Journal and their success will be celebrated at the annual Go Red for Women luncheon on Thursday, November 9, 2017. The local Go Red For Women Luncheon is celebrating it’s 10th Anniversary this year!

BetterU will assist 12 local women on their journey toward improved heart health through lifestyle changes. The 12-week BetterU program is being sponsored by Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation. The program’s goal is to remind all women of the need to make healthy lifestyle choices to prevent their number one and five killers – heart disease and stroke.

Each of the 12 women will receive a three-month membership and personal training at Gold’s Gym, a baseline medical evaluation from Health Quest Medical Practice, and nutrition coaching, heart health seminars and group workouts. They will blog about their progress on a special website devoted to chronicling their progress.

The AHA recommends that all women put their health first with a Well Woman Visit. All women should have this annual physical and discussion to help identify serious health concerns before they become life threatening – such as heart disease and stroke. Heart disease takes the life of one in three women — almost one woman every minute.

The BetterU 12-week program begins August 4th and concludes at the Go Red for Women Luncheon on November 9, 2017 at the Grandview. Follow their progress online at http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/blog/betteru/ and on www.facebook.com/AHANewYork and on Twitter @HVHeartAssoc.

For tickets or info on the Luncheon, visit dutchessulstergored.heart.org or call Danielle Schuka at 845-867-5379.  Go Red for Women Luncheon is sponsored nationally by Macy’s and locally by the Heart Center/Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Northern Dutchess Hospital, the Poughkeepsie Journal, and Q92 FM. BetterU is sponsored by Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Gold’s Gym-Dutchess County, Health Quest Medical Practice, Poughkeepsie Journal, and Q92.

BetterU Participants 2017

Amanda Balint – Carmel
Although I’ve been on statin drugs and beta blockers for decades, through this program I have an opportunity to foster good habits that can improve my health naturally, such as exercising consistently and engaging in a healthy diet.  I also hope to form long-term relationships with my fellow BetterU peers as no doubt many of us must have similar goals.

Robin Commerford –Poughkeepsie
Robin is married with three children and has a family history of heart disease. She wants to start paying attention to her own health—she said she neglects to take care of her own needs and health. She said, “I hope to gain a better foundation surrounding healthy eating habits and exercise that would assist in providing a healthy lifestyle not only for myself but for my family as well.”

Flossie Burke – Glenham
Flossie lost both parents to heart disease—her father died at age 55. Too young. She has battled being overweight her whole life and now has serious health issues. She said, “I must stop abusing my body and my mind with poor choices and gain the strength and knowledge to fight disease and reverse deteriorating health.  I want to accept challenges with confidence rather than anxiety, and get my diabetes and blood pressure under control to get off the meds.”

Gina Bambinelli – Poughkeepsie
Gina has tried different weight loss programs but wants permanent lifestyle change. She said, “During the next 12 weeks, I intend to gain the knowledge I need to change my life. I will transform not only my body, but also my mind so that I can be healthy and strong, no matter what life throws my way. She wants increased strength, stamina, flexibility and weight loss.”

Michelle DeMild – Salt Point
Michelle turned 50 this year (applause!!) and she found her motivation and energy levels declining. She wants to enjoy retirement when the time comes! She said, “I’m looking to learn to make healthy choices to help lose weight, while to finding my motivation and increase my energy levels and to be an example of health for her kids.”

Lisa Morris – Poughkeepsie
You might recognize Lisa Morris from Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union! Welcome, Lisa! Like many women her age, Lisa would like to lose weight. She said, “I’m looking forward to eating healthier to lose weight and gain energy! I plan to fend off the heart disease that runs in my family for as long as I can.”

Diane Labenski – Wappingers
Diane, like many of us has stress in her life! She has risk factors for heart disease and she wants to improve her eating habits and get healthier! She said, “I hope to increase my energy level and stamina through weight loss and better habits so that I can keep up with my grandchildren and be more productive in life.”

Patricia Lucio-Penn – Poughkeepsie
Patricia has a family history of diabetes and heart disease. She works as Director of Human Services and she wants to set a good example and continue to help others. She said, “I hope to increase my core strength and lose weight. I also hope to establish healthier routines to increase my quality of life and strength my heart.”

Grace Gay – Lagrangeville
Grace wants to learn to gain knowledge and experience to make smarter choices and live healthier. She has family history of heart disease that she wants to avoid. She wants to make healthier choices for her parents, who are homebound, and set a healthy example for her children.

Mary Jones – Stormville
Mary said she knows you can do things alone, but with encouragement and support, success can be greater. She grew up in a family with five brothers and three sisters and now she suffers from diabetes like them. Her father, mother, sister and two brothers have passed on due to high blood pressure or complications from diabetes…She said, “My hopes are to recognize that I can be a BetterU if I am mindful enough to boost my well-being, optimism and self-esteem. My family has been a statistic, I don’t want to be.”

Allison Morris – Poughkeepsie
She has always been active but over the past few years, Allison has had tough life changes that have prevented her from taking care of herself. Her maternal family history is filled with stroke—the number three killer of women—and she doesn’t want to be in that situation! She wants healthier habits, weight loss and a healthier mindset!

Abby Paul – Poughkeepsie
Abby is from Poughkeepsie, and has tried many diet plans but nothing is sticking, and she has a family history of diabetes, stroke and obesity. She wants to walk up a flight of stairs with ease. She wants to give her heart a break. “This is an opportunity” she said, “I don’t want to be defined by my family history. I have so much to live for and so much more to do! I look forward to working with an amazing tribe of women who will help hold me accountable to these habits, and hope to inspire others to do the same.”

By |August 4th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Deadline Extended to July 5th for BetterU Challenge

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JULY 5th! APPLY TODAY & SHARE WITH FRIENDS!

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., taking the life of one in three women – almost one woman every minute. However, research shows that 80 percent of cardiac events in women are preventable and linked to poor choices involving diet, exercise and smoking. That’s why the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women® is helping women speak up for their hearts and change this statistic by offering a free 12-week makeover, Go Red BetterU.

Download the application here.

 Powered by the science of the American Heart Association, Go Red BetterU provides guidance to help women transform their overall health through small, simple choices. Go Red BetterU gives women an opportunity to achieve a noticeably better state of well-being and heart health in just 12 weeks. Choose to be a BetterU at GoRedForWomen.org.

 Locally, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation is the proud sponsor of the BetterU Challenge, a 12-week lifestyle change program. Twelve lucky participants will be selected to participate in the 12-week challenge. Each participant will receive:

• Baseline & 12-week medical readings by Health Quest Medical Practice

• 3-month membership to Gold’s Gym – LaGrange

• Personal training with Gold’s Gym

• Nutrition advice from a medical professional

• Group support from other BetterU participants

• The power, resources and tools of GoRedForWomen.org.

Elizabeth Donahue — 2014-15 BetterU Challenger!

 Participants will be photographed before and after the 12-weeks, interviewed by media, asked to write about their experiences on the participant BetterU Blog, and help us celebrate the program by attending as our guests at the Go Red for Women Luncheon on November 9, 2017.

With Go Red BetterU, you’ll learn smart strategies and gain new information on improving and maintaining your health, along with the encouragement and advice of local coaches. Each week will focus on a different area to follow for a complete heart makeover. Live longer and stronger by taking 12 weeks to invest in your health!

Interested in becoming a participant? Read and complete the application by JULY 5th. Download the application here.

For more information, visit our website at dutchessulstergored.heart.org or call 845-867-5379.

Sponsored by Central Hudson, Gold’s Gym, Health Quest Medical Practice, the Poughkeepsie Journal, and Q92.1FM.

By |June 27th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Go Red For Women Luncheon Draws 300 to Fight Women’s #1 Killer–Heart Disease

Heart disease in women can occur in the young and old, in seemingly healthy women as well as those with risk factors. The Westchester-Fairfield American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women Luncheon on Friday, June 2nd put a face on women’s heart disease by sharing local survivors’ stories throughout the event. The Luncheon drew a crowd of more than 300 mostly women, dressed in the signature women and heart disease campaign color—red.

Guests heard inspiring survivor stories, and were educated about heart disease, risk factors and news of medical research and treatments to fight heart disease, all while raising funds to support the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women campaign to fight women’s number one killer—heart disease.

Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. Almost two-thirds (64%) of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. Even if you have no symptoms, you may still be at risk for heart disease.

But the American Heart Association (AHA) is seeking to change that with prevention and awareness through their Go Red For Women Luncheon, set for Friday, June 2nd from 10AM to 2PM, at the Hilton Westchester in Rye. Donations are still being accepted online at http://westfairgoredluncheon.heart.org/.

Kim Salveggi, 43, from Yorktown, and Christine Wayne, 37, of Stamford, CT were featured in a short film. Salveggi, a married mother of two teenage girls, suffered a coronary artery dissection in March of 2015. She was previously diagnosed with depression and hypochondria when symptoms of extreme exhaustion began in September 2014. When more classic heart attack symptoms of chest, jaw and arm pain set in, she feared that nobody would believe what she knew all along—something was seriously wrong. At the emergency room, doctors believed her, and she survived after a stent was inserted during emergency cardiac catheterization. She recently returned to work.

Christine Wayne survived sudden cardiac arrest in December of 2016. She felt tired all day and while in the shower, she began to cough and was overcome with exhaustion and nausea. She said did not want to call 9-1-1, as is recommended. What if someone saw her? Why incur the cost when someone could just come pick her up? When she began to have trouble breathing, she finally called her mother, who said to call 9-1-1.

Another moment’s delay and she might not have made it. On route in the ambulance, her heart stopped four times. She awoke to people counting and shouting “CLEAR!” At the hospital, two stents were put in, and was released after a week in the hospital. She is now back to her daily routine.

Both are advocates for Go Red For Women’s lifesaving messages to learn about, prevent and know the symptoms of heart attack in women. In the video, Salveggi implores women to second opinion and never stop advocating for your health. Wayne wants women to know the symptoms of heart attack and not be embarrassed to call the ambulance—minutes count.

The Go Red For Women Luncheon included a morning health and wellness exhibition featuring local health professionals, networking, and a keynote address by Mara Schiavocampo, an ABC News correspondent and author based in New York. Schiavocampo is a two-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, and best-selling author of, “THINspired,” her personal journey of losing 90 pounds after the birth of her daughter. She said at the event that prior to her lifestyle changes, including a diet overhaul, she used to eat almost exclusively prepared, pre-packaged food, which is typically high in calories, sodium and sugar.

“My definition of health at that time was the absence of illness,” she said.

Now, after her journey of health, she eats almost all fresh, home-cooked meals, including a variety of fruits, vegetables and healthy fish, and doesn’t feel deprived.

An estimated 44 million women in the U.S. are affected by cardiovascular diseases, and 90% of women have one or more risk factors for heart disease or stroke. The good news is 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. Small, incremental changes to lifestyle can go a long way in preventing these leading killers. Quitting smoking, exercising at least 30 minutes per day, maintaining a healthy weight, and eating more fruits and vegetables can help prevent heart disease and stroke. More information is available at GoRedForWomen.org.

Go Red For Women is sponsored Nationally by Macy’s, and locally by Signature Sponsor, Stamford Health. Other sponsors include Greenwich Hospital, Morgan Stanley, New York-Presbyterian, Fuji Film, White Plains Hospital, Buzz Creators, Healthcare News, Professional Women of Westchester, WHUD, Westchester Magazine, and ABC7.

By |June 7th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

“Men Go Red For Women” Event Supports Women’s Heart Health

The Dutchess-Ulster American Heart Association’s “Men Go Red For Women” event at the Marist Boathouse at on Tuesday, June 6th was a great success! Thank you to everyone who attended and supported Go Red For Women!

Men Go Red For Women is a dynamic, committed group of men who are raising awareness, and funds, to fight heart disease, the number one killer of women and men. They’re standing behind the women they care about —wives, mothers, daughters, sisters and friends —while influencing and inspiring communities to support the life-saving work of the Go Red For Women movement.

The event was co-chaired by Craig Irwin and Joshua Mackey, and sponsored by their companies, Merrill Lynch in Poughkeepsie, and Mackey Butts & Wise LLP in Millbrook.

Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. Heart disease causes one in three women’s deaths each year, killing approximately one woman every minute. The AHA states that women are less likely to call 9-1-1 for themselves when experiencing symptoms of a heart attack than they are for someone else. Women comprise only 24 percent of participants in all heart-related studies. An estimated 43 million women in the U.S. are affected by heart disease and ninety percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease. To learn more, visit www.GoRedForWomen.org.

This Men Go Red event featured networking, light fare, beer and wine, provided by Arlington Wines & Liquors, and Half Time in Poughkeepsie. The Men Go Red group will have exclusive events throughout the year and members will receive tickets to the annual Go Red For Women Luncheon set for November 9, 2017 at the Grandview.

For information about joining Men Go Red, please contact Danielle Schuka, Go Red Corporate Events Director at 845-867-5379 or by email at Danielle.schuka@heart.org.

Go Red For Women is sponsored nationally by Macy’s and CVS, and locally by The Heart Center, Vassar Brothers Hospital, Northern Dutchess Hospital, Central Hudson, Gold’s Gym, Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel, The Grandview and Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union.

Apply Today for Dutchess-Ulster BetterU Challenge

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., taking the life of one in three women – almost one woman every minute. However, research shows that 80 percent of cardiac events in women are preventable and linked to poor choices involving diet, exercise and smoking. That’s why the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women® is helping women speak up for their hearts and change this statistic by offering a free 12-week makeover, Go Red BetterU.

Download the application here.

 Powered by the science of the American Heart Association, Go Red BetterU provides guidance to help women transform their overall health through small, simple choices. Go Red BetterU gives women an opportunity to achieve a noticeably better state of well-being and heart health in just 12 weeks. Choose to be a BetterU at GoRedForWomen.org.

 Locally, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation is the proud sponsor of the BetterU Challenge, a 12-week lifestyle change program. Twelve lucky participants will be selected to participate in the 12-week challenge. Each participant will receive:

• Baseline & 12-week medical readings by Health Quest Medical Practice

• 3-month membership to Gold’s Gym – LaGrange

• Personal training with Gold’s Gym

• Nutrition advice from a medical professional

• Group support from other BetterU participants

• The power, resources and tools of GoRedForWomen.org.

Elizabeth Donahue — 2014-15 BetterU Challenger!

 Participants will be photographed before and after the 12-weeks, interviewed by media, asked to write about their experiences on the participant BetterU Blog, and help us celebrate the program by attending as our guests at the Go Red for Women Luncheon on November 9, 2017.

With Go Red BetterU, you’ll learn smart strategies and gain new information on improving and maintaining your health, along with the encouragement and advice of local coaches. Each week will focus on a different area to follow for a complete heart makeover. Live longer and stronger by taking 12 weeks to invest in your health!

Interested in becoming a participant? Read and complete the application by June 26th. Download the application here.

For more information, visit our website at dutchessulstergored.heart.org or call 845-867-5379.

Sponsored by Central Hudson, Gold’s Gym, Health Quest Medical Practice, the Poughkeepsie Journal, and Q92.1FM.

 

West-Fair Go Red For Women Luncheon Fights Heart Disease in Women

Heart disease in women can occur in the young and old, in seemingly healthy women as well as those with risk factors. The Westchester-Fairfield American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women Luncheon on Friday, June 2nd aims to put a face on women’s heart disease by sharing local survivors’ stories, and, here’s a preview–none of the women have their AARP Card yet.

Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. Almost two-thirds (64%) of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. Even if you have no symptoms, you may still be at risk for heart disease.

Christine Wayne and Kim Salveggi, heart disease survivors

But the American Heart Association (AHA) is seeking to change that with prevention and awareness through their Go Red For Women Luncheon, set for Friday, June 2nd from 10AM to 2PM, at the Hilton Westchester in Rye. Tickets are available online at http://westfairgoredluncheon.heart.org/.

Two local film students are producing a video to be debuted at the Go Red For Women Luncheon about the survivors, entitled, “Faces of Heart.” Jeanne Ronan and Marie Venezia are both long-time film students of the Jacob Burns Film Center’s adult courses in Pleasantville. Their 2016 Go Red survivor video won a MarCom Award in February.

“It was extremely rewarding to work on a film project that had a specific purpose in this world. It is also a cause that is personally near and dear to both of us. We were grateful for the opportunity to w

ork with such fantastic women – and we would do it again in a heartbeat!” said Ronan.

Kim Salveggi, 43, from Yorktown, and Christine Wayne, 37, of Stamford, CT will be featured in the short film. Salveggi, a married mother of two teenage girls, suffered a coronary artery dissection in March of 2015. She was previously diagnosed with depression and hypochondria when symptoms of extreme exhaustion began in September 2014. When more classic heart attack symptoms of chest, jaw and arm pain set in, she feared that nobody would believe what she knew all along—something was seriously wrong. At the emergency room, doctors believed her, and she survived after a stent was inserted during emergency cardiac catheterization. She recently returned to work.

Christine Wayne survived sudden cardiac arrest in December of 2016. She felt tired all day and while in the shower, she began to cough and was overcome with exhaustion and nausea. She said did not want to call 9-1-1, as is recommended. What if someone saw her? Why incur the cost when someone could just come pick her up? When she began to have trouble breathing, she finally called her mother, who said to call 9-1-1.

Another moment’s delay and she might not have made it. On route in the ambulance, her heart stopped four times. She awoke to people counting and shouting “CLEAR!” At the hospital, two stents were put in, and was released after a week in the hospital. She is now back to her daily routine.

ABC NEWS – Mara Schiavocampo. (ABC/Heidi Gutman) MARA SCIAVOCAMPO

Both are advocates for Go Red For Women’s lifesaving messages to learn about, prevent and know the symptoms of heart attack in women. In the video, Salveggi implores women to second opinion and never stop advocating for your health. Wayne wants women to know the symptoms of heart attack and not be embarrassed to call the ambulance—minutes count.

The Go Red For Women Luncheon includes a morning health and wellness exhibition featuring local health professionals, networking, and a keynote address by Mara Schiavocampo, an ABC News correspondent and author based in New York. Schiavocampo is a two-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, and best-selling author of, “THINspired,” her personal journey of losing 90 pounds after the birth of her daughter.

Lisa LaRocca, News 12 Westchester reporter, will serve as emcee for the event.

Lisa LaRocca, News12 Reporter

An estimated 44 million women in the U.S. are affected by cardiovascular diseases, and 90% of women have one or more risk factors for heart disease or stroke. The good news is 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. Small, incremental changes to lifestyle can go a long way in preventing these leading killers. Quitting smoking, exercising at least 30 minutes per day, maintaining a healthy weight, and eating more fruits and vegetables can help prevent heart disease and stroke. More information is available at GoRedForWomen.org and at this year’s Go Red For Women luncheon.

Go Red For Women is sponsored Nationally by Macy’s, and locally by Signature Sponsor, Stamford Health. Other sponsors include Greenwich Hospital, Morgan Stanley, New York-Presbyterian, Fuji Film, White Plains Hospital, Buzz Creators, Healthcare News, Professional Women of Westchester, WHUD, Westchester Magazine, and ABC7.

Tickets and event information are online at http://westfairgoredluncheon.heart.org/.

June 1–7 is CPR & AED Awareness Week – Learn Hands-Only CPR to Save Lives

What would you do if someone next to you collapsed because their heart stopped beating from sudden cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs – is a leading cause of death. Each year, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States.

Eastview School students in White Plains received CPR and AED training

When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately receiving CPR from someone nearby. According to the American Heart Association, about 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim’s chance of survival.

Recently, a 16-year old Stamford teen Keyara Zamor saved her 5-year old cousin with Hands-Only CPR skills she learned in 2015 at a CPR training at her Connecticut school.

The American Heart Association You’re the Cure grassroots advocacy group worked to pass CPR in Schools legislation in both Connecticut and New York in recent years. Hundreds of thousands of children will be trained annually because of the law.

More than a dozen Ketcham High School students in New York State have used their CPR skills to save lives. Ketcham was teaching CPR in physical education classes long before the law passed. The AHA recommends that the entire community, not just students, know Hands-Only CPR to help improve survival rates.

click to enlarge

If you are called on to perform CPR in an emergency, you will most likely be trying to save the life of someone you love: a child, a spouse, a parent or a friend because 70 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen in homes.

About 46 percent of people who experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest receive the immediate help that they need before professional help arrives. Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR for cardiac arrest at home, at work or in public spaces.

Hands-Only CPR has just two easy steps, performed in this order: (1) Call 9-1-1 if you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse; and (2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of a familiar song that has 100 to 120 beats per minute.

Song examples include “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees, “Crazy in Love” by Beyoncé featuring Jay-Z, “Hips Don’t Lie” by Shakira” or “Walk the Line” by Johnny Cash. People feel more confident performing Hands-Only CPR and are more likely to remember the correct rate when trained to the beat of a familiar song.

When performing CPR, you should push on the chest at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute, which corresponds to the beat of the song examples above.

Watch the 90-second demo video. Visit www.heart.org/handsonlycpr to watch the Hands-Only CPR instructional video. Hands-Only CPR is a natural introduction to CPR, and the AHA encourages everyone to learn conventional CPR as a next step. You can find a CPR class near you at heart.org/findacourse and/or purchase a CPR Anytime® Kit at shopheart.org/cpr-anytime.