Move More on National Walking Day

Move more to get Healthy For Good™!

On Wednesday, April 5th, thousands of Americans will take a step towards being Healthy For Good, and walk to celebrate the American Heart Association’s (AHA) National Walking Day, sponsored locally by Nice Pak/PDI in Orangeburg.walking day

The American Heart Association will kick off the month-long campaign on National Walking Day, April 5, to encourage people to move more by increasing their physical activity. The campaign is broken down into weekly themes. Week one focuses on walking and the basic tools you need to get started. Walking is one of the safest, least expensive, and most sustainable forms of exercise. Weeks two and three focus on recreational sports and outdoor activities the whole family can do together, and week four focuses on mindful movement and reducing stress by doing activities such as yoga, Pilates and tai chi.

The American Heart Association recommends that adults participate in at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity or a combination of both each week. That’s about 30 minutes most days of the week. Kids should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.

Walking Day is part of the AHA’s “Healthy For Good” movement, designed to inspire all Americans to live healthier by making small changes today that can create a difference in your health for decades to come. Healthy For Good is sponsored locally by Orange Regional Medical Center.merritt7

Studies have suggested that moderate physical activity has many proven benefits for overall health, such as lowering blood pressure, increasing HDL, or “good”, cholesterol and controlling weight. Exercise can also improve circulation, manage stress, counter anxiety and depression, improve muscle strength and help control diabetes. All these changes help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers.

Nice Pak/PDI, Cardinal Health, Mount Saint Mary College, and Orange Regional Medical Center are just a few of the organizations sponsoring National Walking Day events at their workplaces as part of worksite wellness programs. To help create a culture of health at work, the American Heart Association offers a free Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit for organizations at http://bit.ly/AHAToolkit.nicepak1

For more information about National Walking Day, and to download a free toolkit, visit www.heart.org/movemore.  Residents are invited to join one of the many regional Heart Walks to keep moving, including the TriCounty Heart Walk, set for Sunday, May 7th at Harriman State Park. Register online at www.tricountyheartwalk.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Healthy For Good Sponsor, Orange Regional Medical Center. Local sponsors include HOLT Construction, St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital, Orange Bank & Trust, NicePak – PDI, Active International, Cardinal Health, Crystal Run Healthcare, M &T Bank, Highland Medical and Nyack Hospital. Media sponsors include: AJ Ross Media, Rock City Media, Hudson Valley Magazine and Mix 97.7.

New York State Budget Can Target Issues to Help Improve Health

 

As the April 1 deadline looms for this year’s state budget, the American Heart Association calls on the state Legislature to keep the health of New Yorkers in the forefront.capital

Two-thirds of New Yorkers are overweight or obese, costing the state $11.8 billion in medical costs. Two initiatives that the American Heart Association has advocated to have in the budget would help New Yorkers combat obesity: The Empire State Trail and funding the Healthy Food, Healthy Communities Fund.

The $200 million that Gov. Cuomo has proposed to create the nation’s largest multi-use trail, would provide 750 miles of safe and attractive trail where people could walk, bike, push a baby stroller, rollerblade – or engage in any kind of activity they like. Groups like Parks and Trails New York, the Open Space Institute, Scenic Hudson, and the retailer REI, have also supported the trail.

The Healthy Food, Healthy Communities Program would provide funding to establish markets in areas where people have limited access to healthy food. It’s estimated that 1.7 million New Yorkers lack access to stores with healthy food options. Low-income neighborhoods have 50 percent fewer supermarkets than healthy neighborhoods.

“Obesity is one of the leading risk factors for heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 5 killers of all Americans,” said Bob Elling, paramedic and chair of the New York State Advocacy Committee of the American Heart Association. “Investing in the Empire State Trail and the Healthy Food Healthy, Communities Fund could save New York real money in health-related expenses, while helping all New Yorkers live longer, healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.”

In addition, the AHA would like to see Brianna’s Law included in the budget, providing for CPR training every two years for all police officers.

The American Heart Association urges all New Yorkers to contact their elected officials to ask for this funding through the You’re the Cure grassroots advocacy network. www.yourethecure.org ytc-life-is-why-dual-logo

By |March 28th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Little Red Hats to Raise Awareness for Congenital Heart Defects

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Baby Eliana at Good Sam Hospital

The American Heart Association (AHA), in connection with The Children’s Heart Foundation, is offering the “Little Hats, Big Hearts” program for the second year in a row locally. Thousands of little red hats are being delivered to 26 regional hospitals in New York and Connecticut during February, American Heart Month, to help raise awareness for congenital heart defects, or CHD, the most common type of birth defect in the country. Every baby born at participating hospitals during February will receive a little red hat, and parents will receive healthy lifestyle educational information.

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Danbury Hospital

The AHA received donations from more than 100 volunteer knitting and crocheting enthusiasts in the community to help raise awareness for CHD during Congenital Heart Defects (CHD) Awareness Week, February 7 – 14. American Heart Month aims to raise awareness of heart disease, the number one killer of American men and women.

Congenital heart defects are structural problems with the heart present at birth. They result when a mishap occurs during heart development soon after conception and often before the mother is aware that she is pregnant. Defects range in severity from simple problems, such as “holes” between chambers of the heart, to very severe malformations, such as complete absence of one or more chambers or valves.

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Phelps Hospital

The AHA put a call out to knitting and crocheting enthusiasts in December, and little red hats came pouring in from all over the region. Approximately 2,500 hats will be distributed. Local yarn shops donated red yarn and Fabricare Cleaners in Norwalk and Red Cap Cleaners in Poughkeepsie donated their services to wash and sanitize the hats.

“We hear these heart-warming stories shared by some of the knitters who were donating hats in memory of a child lost to CHD, or happier, one who lived. The American Heart Association funds pediatric research and we offer healthy lifestyle programs for children in schools throughout the county,” said Carolyn Torella, AHA spokesperson, “We’re so grateful for the community’s generosity and support to help raise awareness for children’s heart health.”

The American Heart Association is committed to raising awareness for CHD, and helping children live stronger lives through education, research and public policies. In fact, the organization’s funding for pediatric cardiac research is second only to the federal government. Thanks to AHA advocacy, laws were passed in CT and NYS to ensure that every baby born receives pulse-oximetry testing, which can help identify heart defects immediately after birth. The AHA also creates guidelines for, and trains parents, caregivers and medical professionals in infant and child CPR.

More information about the Little Hats, Big Heart program is online at www.heart.org/littlehatsbighearts or by contacting the AHA at 845-867-5374. Learn more about congenital heart defects at www.heart.org/CHD. Parents of children with CHD may find support online at the AHA’s new Support Network at http://supportnetwork.heart.org/

Thanks to all our knitting & crocheting volunteers and to all our participating hospitals who give all their hearts to care for newborns! 

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Good Sam Hospital

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White Plains Hospital

NYS Public Health Groups Call on Governor and Legislature to Raise Tobacco Age of Sale to 21

 

In response to the American Lung Association’s recent “State of Tobacco Control” Report 2017, the American Lung Association, American Heart Association, and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) today gathered with state Sen. Diane Savino (D-Staten Island), and Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal (D-Manhattan), at the State Capitol to call on the state to immediately pass “Tobacco 21” legislation, raising the age of sale of tobacco products to 21.  Both Savino and Rosenthal have introduced legislation to the Senate (S3978) and Assembly (A273).Copy of 18 (1)

“The key to reducing the number of citizens who smoke is to prevent initiation of tobacco use in the first place,” said Senator Diane Savino.  “Delaying children and young adults access to tobacco products will reduce the likelihood that they ever start smoking.  Raising the smoking age to twenty-one will largely remove cigarettes from high schools and will help eliminate a popular source of tobacco for children and young adults.  This legislation will help prevent a generation of New Yorkers from becoming addicted to smoking, and we can ultimately save thousands of lives.”

“Every year tobacco ensnares tens of thousands of young New Yorkers in its death grip,” said Assemblymember Linda B. Rosenthal. “The statistics that surround youth tobacco use though, are not our fate. I am proud to have reintroduced legislation to increase the purchasing age for tobacco products across New York State from 18 to 21. With incredible partners like the American Lung Association, the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association, we have a real chance to protect generations to come.”

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the U.S., and increasing the sales age for tobacco products could have a big impact on youth tobacco use in New York State. According to a 2015 report from the National Academy of Medicine, raising the tobacco age to 21 nationwide would prevent 223,000 deaths among people born between 2000 and 2019, including 50,000 fewer dying from lung cancer, the nation’s leading cancer killer.

“More than 1 in 4 high school students in the state of New York currently use tobacco products,” said Jeff Seyler, President and CEO of the American Lung Association of the Northeast.  “This year’s State of Tobacco Control Report card gave New York State a “D” due to its failure to pass a statewide Tobacco 21 law.  We know that increasing the minimum age of sale for tobacco products to 21 will not only give New York an A grade in this category, but more importantly it will significantly reduce youth tobacco use, long term addiction, and save thousands of lives.”

Every day, nationally, about 2,500 youth under 18 try their first cigarette and 400 kids become regular daily smokers. Two-thirds of 10th grade students and nearly half of 8th grade students say it is easy to get cigarettes. According to a National Academy of Medicine report, smokers age 18-19 years old are a major supplier for younger kids who rely on friends, classmates and peers to buy tobacco products. A comprehensive statewide law raising the age of sale would help reduce the number of high school students who have easy access to tobacco products because they would be less likely to have legal buyers ages 21 and older in their social networks.

Julie Hart, director of New York government relations of ACS CAN said, “Given that about 95 percent of smokers started before the age of 21, it is imperative to take action to help our young New Yorkers. Tobacco 21 is a promising strategy and could stop kids before they begin a deadly tobacco addiction, thereby saving lives and health care costs.”

“Smoking is a leading cause of heart disease, the No. 1 killer of all Americans,” said Dr. Suzie Mookherjee, cardiologist and member of the Founders Affiliate Board of Directors for the American Heart Association. “If a person doesn’t start smoking before they are 21, the chance that they will ever start decreases dramatically. This is a deadly habit that costs New Yorkers $16 billion per year. I urge the state Legislature to protect our youth by passing Tobacco 21 across the state. It is up to us to save young lives.”

“Increasing the tobacco age to 21 will prevent young people from using tobacco, save lives and help make the next generation tobacco-free,” said Kevin O’Flaherty, Northeast Regional Director for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. “This proposal will reduce tobacco use among youth and young adults – age groups when nearly all tobacco use begins and that are heavily targeted by the tobacco industry. It will also help keep tobacco out of high schools, where younger teens often obtain tobacco products from older students.”

“Every day as you leave Burnt Hills High School, will see a group of kids across the road in the church parking lot smoking,” said Conner McClernan, senior at Burnt Hills High School and member of Reality Check, a youth-led movement that helps fight back against tobacco.  “We’re no longer talking about just numbers on a piece of paper or spreadsheet. It is the kids you’ve had pictures of on your mantles since the day they were born.”

While several localities in New York acted to pass local legislation raising the age of sale to 21 in 2016, New York State earned a nearly failing grade of “D” in the Tobacco 21 category of the report for failing to pass comprehensive statewide legislation to keep tobacco out of the hands of young adults. This year’s State of Tobacco Control Report revealed that 28.8% of high school students in the state use at least one tobacco product.  The report also concluded that over $10 billion was spent on health care costs due to smoking in New York and 28,170 New Yorkers lost their lives to tobacco.

By |January 31st, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Volunteers Rally to Support American Heart Association

Marist College welcomed volunteers from over 50 local companies and organizations for the American Heart Association’s (AHA) annual Heart Walk volunteer rally and kickoff event.

Vince Amodeo, Business Banking Regional Manager at M&T Bank for the Hudson Valley, will serve as Heart Walk chair for 2017 Heart Walk. The event is the American Heart Association’s biggest annual fund raiser.img_6855

Amodeo encouraged volunteers, team leaders, businesses and community leaders to sponsor and form teams to join the Heart Walk. Two events will be held locally. The Dutchess Heart Walk will be held on March 25th at a new location, Marist College, and the Ulster event is set for April 2nd at SUNY New Paltz. Registration online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org.img_6864

“I know my support of the Heart Walk will insure that the AHA’s good work continues and by walking, I will be creating a healthier me and a healthier community,” said Amodeo, “Residents can join the Heart Walk to support a family member or friend, or for their own hearts. Every step, every dollar raised helps the American Heart Association’s mission.”

According to the AHA, walking briskly can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running. Adults need 30 minutes of physical activity per day, at least 150 minutes of moderate activity per week or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week for heart health. Kids need 60 minutes daily.

img_6883Madison Dallies & Matthew Burchell are serving as the 2017 Heart Walk Youth Honorees – both are survivors from congenital heart defects.

Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S. Thanks to progress made in awareness, early intervention and research, stroke has moved from the #3 killer to the #5 killer in recent years.

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L to R: Vince Amodeo, Heart Walk Chair, Beth Christy, Townsquare Media, David Ping, Health Quest, AHA Board Chair with youth honorees Madison & Matthew

Companies interested in supporting the Heart Walk with sponsorship or teams should call Jaclyn Renner, Event Director, at the American Heart Association at (845) 867-5378 or by email jaclyn.renner@heart.org. Event info and registration for teams and individuals is online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org.

Health Quest is the 2017 “My Heart, My Life” sponsor. M& T Bank will be Tribute Wall sponsor. Rondout Savings bank is the Ulster County CPR in school’s  sponsor. Other Local Sponsors for this year’s event are: Adams Fairacre Farms, Laerdal Medical, UnitedHealthcare, Ellenville Regional Hospital, Marshall & Sterling and Premier Medical Group. Media sponsors include Townsquare Media, Mix 97.7, Southern Dutchess News and Hudson Valley Magazine.

By |January 12th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Heart Healthy Thanksgiving Tips from the American Heart Association

Mashed potatoes with cream. Stuffing made with sausage and butter. Candied yams with caramel sauce and marshmallows. Pies, cakes and cookies. It’s a Thanksgiving buffet of our dreams. But over-indulging in these beloved holiday foods can derail your healthy eating habits, causing dreaded holiday weight gain. And that’s weight we don’t lose over the course of the year.Heart-Healthy-Thanksgiving-Tips

Nearly 70% of American adults are either overweight or obese. Being obese increases th
e risk for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and more.

According to the American Heart Association, more than 80% of heart disease can be prevented with simply lifestyle changes like exercising 30 minutes most days of the week; eating a healthier diet filled with fruits, vegetables and whole grains; and limiting sodium, saturated fats and added sugars.

Enjoying time with our family and celebrating with traditional foods we know and love doesn’t have to be unhealthy. To keep your diet, and health, in check over the Thanksgiving holiday, try these healthy tips from the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women campaign, including ways to minimize stress and smart substitutions for your holiday meals.

Try healthy recipe substitutes to make your favorite holiday recipes better for heart health.

Baking

  • Instead of butter, substitute equal parts cinnamon-flavored, no-sugar-added applesauce.
  • Instead of sugar, use a lower-calorie sugar substitute.
  • Instead of whole or heavy cream, substitute low-fat or skim milk.
  • Instead of using only white flour, use half white and half whole-wheat flour.
  • Instead of adding chocolate chips or candies, use dried fruit, like cranberries or cherries.
  • Use extracts like vanilla, almond and peppermint to add flavor, instead of sugar or butter.

Cooking

  • Use vegetable oils such as olive oil instead of butter (even in your mashed potatoes).
  • Use herbs and spices, like rosemary and cloves, to flavor dishes instead of butter and salt.
  • Use whole-grain breads and pastas instead of white.
  • Bake, grill or steam vegetables instead of frying.
  • Instead of whole milk or heavy cream, substitute low-fat or fat-free/skim milk.

Prepare healthy vegetables, eat a balanced meal

Now that you’ve prepared some of your Thanksgiving meal with healthy substitutes, prepare yourself a balanced plate of all your favorite holiday foods, starting with a salad and vegetables. Eating your veggies will ensure you get the nutrients you need and will help fill you up so you don’t overload on the foods your body needs less of, such as rolls, stuffing and pie.

Increase physical activity

The American Heart Association advises increasing physical activity over Thanksgiving and throughout the holiday season to combat the extra calories and additional stress. Go for a family walk after each meal or gathering. Play catch with your kids or walk your dog the long route. Take just 40 minutes and go to the gym to release endorphins your body needs to stay healthy.

Keep stress to a minimum

There’s so much to do at the holidays. Taking care of family, cooking, cleaning—Thanksgiving can involve a lot of activities that not only keep you busy, but can also increase your level of stress. Keep stress to a minimum with stress management techniques. The AHA recommends:

  • Planning ahead to help you with time management
  • Focusing on one thing at a time
  • Taking time to relax & not sweating the small stuff

Get enough sleep

Part of living a heart-healthy lifestyle means getting enough sleep. Why? Because your quality of sleep can impact your heart health. The American Heart Association recommends adults get six to eight hours of sleep per night. Over the holiday, get into bed early to give yourself enough time to wind down after your day and to fall asleep faster and more soundly.

For more tips, download the AHA’s free Holiday Healthy Eating Guide at http://bit.ly/AHAHolidayGuide2015.

Learn more about a healthier lifestyle at www.heart.org/gettinghealthy and get free recipes at www.heart.org/recipes.

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RECIPE
Try this quick, Simple Cooking with Heart recipe for using holiday leftovers anytime you’re craving Thanksgiving flavors. It’ll be a nice change after a heavy meal.

Festive Turkey Rice Salad

Presented by:  Walmart – Simple Cooking With Heart

Serves 6 – 203 Calories – 25 mg Sodium

Ingredients

2 Tbsp. rice vinegar
2 Tbsp. lime juice
1 Tbsp. olive oil
1 Tbsp. honey
1 tsp. ground ginger
3 1/2 cups cooked wild or brown rice
1 1/2 cups chopped, boneless, skinless, cooked turkey breast
1/3 cup dried cranberries
1 bunch chopped green onions (1/2 cup)

Directions
In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, lime juice, oil, honey and ginger; set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the rice, turkey, cranberries and green onion. Toss with ginger dressing. Refrigerate until serving.

Additional Tips

You can also toss leftover peas or your veggies of choice into the salad. Make this delightful salad year round using Rotisserie chicken or leftover chicken breast. Use quick-cooking couscous instead of rice.

Kids in the Kitchen: Have the kids help you measure out the ingredients and pour into the bowl.

Nutritional Info

Per serving:
Calories Per Serving 203
Total Fat 2.9 g
Saturated Fat 0.5 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.7 g
Cholesterol 29 mg
Sodium 25 mg
Carbohydrates 30 g
Fiber 2 g
Sugars 9 g
Protein 15 g
Dietary Exchanges: 1 1/2 starch, 1/2 fruit, 1 1/2 lean meat

By |November 24th, 2015|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Nominate Someone for a Lifestyle Change Award

 

Do you know someone whose health has greatly improved as a result of making long-term healthy lifestyle changes? Have you lost a lot of weight in the past year, started living healthier or know someone who has? The American Heart Association invites you to nominate yourself or a healthy friend for the Lifestyle Change Award.

The Westchester County Region of the American Heart Association is accepting nominations for their Lifestyle Change Award, sponsored locally by Merit Direct. The award honors individuals who have made positive changes to improve their quality of life and overall health.

Ideal candidates are people who have taken control of their health in areas of diet, exercise or tobacco cessation and seen positive results in weight, BMI, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar. Winners will be recognized at the association’s Heart Walk on October 4th at Kensico Dam, Valhalla, NY.

To nominate an individual for a Lifestyle Change Award download the form at www.westchesterheartwalk.org or by calling Jennifer Gelick at 203-295-2943. Application deadline is September 28th.

Heart Walk registration is open online at www.westchesterheartwalk.org. Corporate, community and family teams are welcome to register to walk for their own heart health and the funds raised will help other hearts in our community.

Achieving a heart healthy lifestyle starts with knowing your personal heart score, according to the AHA. To get a free measurement of your personal heart health, the American Heart AIMG_2376ssociation recommends focusing on seven heart health factors known as “Life’s Simple 7” to achieve ideal health. To find out where you stand on Life’s Simple 7 and to get an individualized action plan for improving your heart score, visit www.MyLifeCheck.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Signature and Regional Chain of Survival Sponsor, Westchester Medical Center, National Walking Day sponsor New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, White Plains Hospital, Fuji Film, Merit Direct and Stop & Shop, and media sponsors Examiner Media, Westchester Magazine and 107.1 The Peak.

For more information about the Heart Walk or to start a team, please email jennifer.gelick@heart.org or call 203-295-2943 To sign up your team online, visit www.westchesterheartwalk.org.

 

By |September 2nd, 2015|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments