Volunteer Chair Announced for Heart Walk Event

We are proud to announce that D. Douglas Miller, M.D., C.M., M.B.A., will serve as Executive Champion the Westchester Heart Walk event, set for Sunday, October 2nd at Kensico Dam in Valhalla. The Heart Walk is the AHA’s biggest annual event, raising more than $343,500 for AHA programs and research at last year’s event.dr miller headshot

Miller will appeal to local businesses and community leaders to sponsor and form teams to join the Heart Walk to support the AHA’s mission to build healthier lives free from cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

Heart disease costs employers more than $3 billion annually, according to the AHA.

“It just makes good sense for businesses to support this cause, as well as encourage employees to pursue a heart healthy lifestyle in the workplace,” he said.

Miller is the Dean of the School of Medicine at New York Medical College in Valhalla. Prior to his role at NYMC, he served as Dean of Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, as well as Chair of the Health Sciences Council at the University of Alberta.

An internationally recognized cardiologist and clinician-scientist, Dr. Miller has served as a leader in academic medicine and chief academic/executive officer for more than 25 years. His work has resulted in more than 110 peer-reviewed papers and multiple patents, and he serves on the editorial boards of many renowned influential journals.

The Heart Walk is a celebration of year-round efforts by local organizations to create a “culture of health” in the workplace. The American Heart Association encourages worksites to support healthier behaviors at work through the AHA’s Workplace Health Solutions program. Heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., and physical inactivity doubles the risk. Information is online at www.heart.org/workplacewellness.

Companies interested in supporting the Heart Walk with sponsorship or teams should call Jennifer Miller at 203- 295-2943 or email Jennifer.miller@heart.org. To register online, please visit www.westchesterhearheartwalk.org.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by New York Medical College, White Plains Hospital, WMC Health | Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health, Northern Westchester Hospital/Northwell Health, Stop & Shop and Fuji Film. Media sponsors include News 12 Westchester, Buzz Creators, and Westchester Magazine.

nymedicalcollege

By |September 20th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Summer Heat Stroke Warning

The weather forecast this week is calling for hot, hot, hot temps in the 90’s–and humidity. Whatever brings you outside — a bike ride with friends, a jog in the park or just a stroll around the block — it’s important to stay safe when the temperature rises. The American Heart Association offers these tips to stay safe in the summer heat.

Tips for heart patients
If you’re a heart patient, older than 50 or overweight, you might need to take special precautions in the heat, according to Gerald Fletcher, M.D., professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, in Jacksonville, Fla.

Check with your healthcare professional before starting an exercise routine if you are experiencing symptoms or have a specific medical question or chronic disease. Certain heart medications like beta blockers, ace receptor blockers, ace inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and diuretics (which deplete the body of sodium) can exaggerate the body’s response to heat, Fletcher said.

But Fletcher points out that it’s important to keep taking your medications —and taking them when you’re supposed to.

Even if they’re not on medications, older people also need to take precautions in the heat.

“If you’re older than 50, you may not be aware that you’re thirsty,” Fletcher said. “If you’re going to be outside, it’s important to drink water even if you don’t think you need it.”

Tips for everyone
Think you’re ready to brave the heat? Watch the clock and buddy up, Fletcher said. It’s best to avoid the outdoors in the early afternoon (about noon to 3 p.m.) because the sun is usually at its strongest, putting you at higher risk for heat-related illnesses.

If you can, exercise with a friend, because it’s safer — and more fun — to have someone at your side. Here are some other tips:

  • Get off on the right foot. You probably sweat the most in your shoes, so choose well-ventilated shoes and look for socks that repel perspiration. Foot powders and antiperspirants can also help with sweat.
  • Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing in breathable fabrics such as cotton, or a synthetic fabric that repels sweat. Add a hat and/or sunglasses.
  • Drink up. Before you get started, apply a water-resistant sunscreen with at least SPF 15, and reapply it every two hours. Stay hydrated by drinking a few cups of water before, during and after your exercise. Avoid caffeinated or alcoholic beverages.
  • Take regular breaks. Find some shade or a cool place, stop for a few minutes, hydrate and start again.

Whatever you do, don’t throw in the towel, Fletcher said. “Don’t NOT exercise — adapt!”

Symptoms of heat exhaustion:http---prod.cdata.app.sprinklr.com-DAM-261-hot_weather-027d6d50-6600-4f35-a7bd-8895112c08bd-2124490860-2016-07-06 14-51-07

  • Headaches
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Dizziness and light-headedness
  • Weakness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dark urine

If you experience these symptoms, move to a cooler place, stop exercising and cool down immediately by using cool wet cloths, compresses, and fanning. You may need to seek medical attention.

Symptoms of heat stroke:
The symptoms of heatstroke include (call 911 or the local emergency number right away):

  • Fever (temperature above 104 °F)
  • Irrational behavior
  • Extreme confusion
  • Dry, hot, and red skin
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Rapid, weak pulse
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

If you experience these symptoms, seek medical attention right away.

Learn More:

By |July 6th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

The Top 10 Reasons Men Put Off Doctor Visits and 10 Reasons Why They Should Go

What better gift on Father’s Day than to support the men in your life so they can be healthy? Something as simple as visiting your physician for an annual checkup is a simple, and essential, step to keeping your heart healthy and yourself healthy.

Why, then, do some men refuse to go to the doctor regularly? The American Heart Association shares here 10 reasons why many men skip this important appointment. And, more importantly, 10 ways to counter those reasons and get yourself or a person you care about to see a doctor.

“I don’t have a doctor.”

Step one toward staying healthy is finding a doctor you trust.  But you’ll never know if you trust one unless you try. Check your insuranmen docce company or local listings for doctors in your area. Call their offices and ask questions, or check around online. It’s also a good idea to check with friends and family for recommended doctors.

“I don’t have insurance.”

Everybody should have insurance under the Affordable Care Act. If you still don’t, here’s all the information you need to get signed up in our Consumer Health Care section.

“There’s probably nothing wrong.”

You may be right but … you’re not a doctor.  That’s why you need one, to be sure. Some serious diseases don’t have symptoms. High blood pressure is one, and it can cause heart attack and stroke. (That’s why they call it “the silent killer.”)  High cholesterol is another often symptomless condition. Ditto diabetes. Finding a health problem early can make a huge difference in the quality and length of your life.

“I don’t have time.”

There are about 8,766 hours in a year, and you want to save … two? When those two hours could save your life if you really DO need a doctor? If you want to spend more time with your family, these two hours aren’t the ones to lose. Try some of these tips to find time for the whole family to get moving.

“I don’t want to spend the money.”

It makes more sense to spend a little and save a lot than to save a little and spend a lot. If you think spending time with a doctor is expensive, try spending time in a hospital.Blood pressure monitoring

“Doctors don’t DO anything.”

When you see a barber, you get a haircut. When you see the dentist, your teeth get cleaned. But when you get a checkup, the doctor just gives you tests. It may seem like you don’t get anything, but you do. You get news and knowledge that can bring better health, if you act on it.

“I don’t want to hear what I might be told.”

Maybe you smoke, drink too much, have put on weight. Even so, your doctor’s there to help you. You can deny your reality, but you can’t deny the consequences. So be smart: Listen to someone who’ll tell you truths you need to hear. Be coachable.

“I’ve got probe-a-phobia.”

You don’t need a prostate cancer exam until you’re 50. Even then, remember that your chances of survival are much better if it’s caught early. So it’s worth the exam. But it’s only one small portion of a physical. Don’t let one test stop you from getting all the benefits of an annual physical.

“I’d rather tough it out.”

If pro athletes can play hurt and sacrifice themselves for the team, you ought to be able to suck it up, right? Wrong! The Game osigns heart attackf Life is about staying healthy for a long time – a lifetime.

“My significant other has been nagging me to get a checkup.”

OK, so you don’t want to give in. But isn’t it POSSIBLE you could be wrong? Give in on this one. See the doctor.

When it comes down to it, there are no good reasons not to see the doctor, only excuses. The American Heart Association encourages everyone to have an annual check-up. Don’t wait. Schedule your annual physical today. Your heart is counting on you!

Learn more at www.heart.org/gettinghealthy.

By |June 15th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Community Volunteers and Heroes Honored by American Heart

Imagine you were at work and your co-worker collapsed next to you—his heartbeat stopped. You only have four minutes to help before he dies. Would you know what to do to save his life?

Luckily for Bob Wilson, his Culinary Institute of America colleagues knew what to do. They used CPR and an AED when his heart suddenly stopped beating while he was walking on campus. His rescuers were honored at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 1st Annual Volunteer Awards event on June 14th at the Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel.Bob Wilsons Heroes

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death. This electrical malfunction in the heart causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) disrupting the normal flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs, causing death within minutes. Each year, over 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. According to the AHA, 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. But when a bystander immediately uses CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim’s chance of survival.

Wilson had trouble breathing and collapsed while walking with a friend, Laurie Lecomte, on their usual morning walk. She ran to get a campus safety officer, and Carl Wilson (no relation) responded. Al Siefert, dispatcher, called 9-1-1.

Jeff Levine, Communications Manager at the CIA, and Neil Garrison, Supervisor of Environmental Health & Safety, both former EMTs, had just arrived in the parking lot for their workdays, and saw their colleague giving CPR to a victim. They ran to assist as Safety Officer, Rob Barclay brought an automatic external defibrillator, which can restore a normal heart rhythm. EMS paramedics arrived quickly and took over. He was transported to Vassar Hospital and was back to work three weeks later.Bob Wilson

“Why did Bob Wilson survive? Because the Chain of Survival is strong at the Culinary. First, his colleagues recognized it was a cardiac emergency—they got help immediately and called 911. He’s alive because three bystanders knew CPR and didn’t delay in using it. They brought an AED to Bob’s side for early defibrillation, and paramedics were at the scene quickly. Without their fast intervention and training in CPR, we wouldn’t be celebrating Bob Wilson’s life,” said David Violante, Arlington Fire District Director of Emergency Medical Services, and AHA board member.

As rare as survival is from cardiac arrest, this is the second cardiac arrest victim saved on campus. In 2008, CIA student Douglas Chrisman collapsed during class in a kitchen. Again, the Chain of Survival was strong and his life was saved. Carl Wilson and Garrison assisted then, too.

Levine said when he was an EMT, he’d used CPR dozens of times, with only two victims survivinEmpire State Bank Award 2016g. This was the first friend he saved with CPR. Garrison is an American Heart Association CPR/AED & First Aid Instructor.

“We train for this very situation, but we hope it never happens,” said Garrison, “It just proves that the chain of survival here on campus and in the local community is strong and does work.  Being CPR-trained is a life skill that everyone shoul d have and the opportunity to help someone can occur anywhere and anytime, when least expected,” said Garrison.

Why should you know CPR? The AHA states that 70 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen outside the hospital—you will most likely be trying to save the life of someone you love. View the AHA’s training video at www.handsonlycpr.org.

The American Heart Association also recognized community and school volunteers for their service to the AHA’s slate of annual events including Heart Walk, Go Red For Women, Youth Market programs and community-based programs.

Anthony Bongiorno 2016 Spirit Award Winner – Hands-Only CPR training in community

Top Individual Fundraiser Heart Walk – Dr. Thomas Mawhinney is a cardiac arrest survivor, past honoree and this year he raised over $6,000 to support the work of the Heart Association.IMG_9854

Heart Walk Awards – Corporate

  • IBM with $71,773.00 raised
  • Adam’s Fairacre Farms, who had a record breaking year raising $43,792
  • Health Quest, whose teams raised $14,080 this year

Kid with Heart award, presented to Ryley Neser. Ryley is a 3rd grader at Titusville Intermediate School in the Arlington School District. For the past two years, Ryley has been the top fundraiser during his school’s Jump Rope for Heart event. Ryley jumps and raises donations in honor of his younger sister, Lily. Lily with a genetic disorder called 5p minus syndrome and two ventricular septal defects. Ryley has raised over $5,000 for the American Heart Association during his two years of participating in Jump Rope for Heart and has done a great of communicating to his classmates why it is so important to jump for kids with special hearts.

School District with Heart – Arlington Central School District. Every school in the district participates in one or several AHAIMG_9960 programs to raise money or awareness – including Jump Rope for Heart, Hoops for Heart, Wear Red Day, and the Fit Friendly Workplace program.

Norm Schofield Award – The Norm Schofield Award is named in honor of the H. Normington Schofield, a former Physical Education teacher at Gayhead Elementary who passed away from a cardiac event. It is given each year to the school in the Hudson Valley that raises the most donations for Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart. Presented to: Gayhead Elementary

Youth Market Program Coordinator of the Year – Kathleen Howard, the physical education teacher at Eugene Brooks Intermediate School in the Webutuck School District.

See our photo album from the event here.

By |June 15th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|1 Comment

Apply Now for Dutchess-Ulster Women’s BetterU Challenge

The American Heart Association invites women to “fall into” a healthier lifestyle through the BetterU Challenge. The AHA invites all women to apply for the 6th Annual BetterU Challenge, sponsored by Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation. The 12-week program is designed to improve cardiovascular health through simple lifestyle changes and prevent heart disease—women’s number one killer. The program is part of the Go Red For Women Luncheon, which is moving from its usual February timeframe to the fall.small betteru logo

Applications are being accepted now through June 24th to be one of the twelve women participants. Download the application at the http://dutchessulstergored.heart.org.

BetterU is a free health, nutrition and fitness program that can help all women make better lifestyle choices. Each week focuses on a different area of heart health and provides step-by-step guidance to help women transform their overall health through small lifestyle changes.

IMG_4384-682x1024

Elizabeth Donahue, “before BetterU” photo

The 12 women selected for the program will receive a three-month membership and personal training at Gold’s Gym, medical evaluation from Health Quest Medical Practice, and free health seminars from local health experts. The BetterU participants will chronicle their journey on a special blog, and be celebrated at the annual Go Red for Women luncheon on October 28th.

“Central Hudson continues to support women’s health in the Hudson Valley through the BetterU program. Heart disease is still the number one killer of women but prevention through simple lifestyle changes can save women’s lives,” said Denise Doring VanBuren, Vice President of Public Relations at Central Hudson, “For five years, we have witnessed women’s lives radically changed for the better because of this program. We invite women to put their health first on their to-do lists by applying for BetterU.”

According to research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, deaths from heart disease have declined dramatically over the last few decades but young people, particularly women, are not sharing equally in that improvement. Researchers believe a lack of effective preventive strategies for young people, particularly women, is to blame, and they call for more research into non-traditional risk factors for this understudied group, like stress and obesity.

ElizabethDonahue

Elizabeth Donahue fall 2015 “After BetterU’

Heart disease and stroke takes the life of one in three women — almost one woman every minute. More women than men die of heart disease and stroke. Research shows that 80 percent of cardiac events in women are preventable with simple lifestyle choices involving diet, exercise and avoiding smoking.

The 2015 BetterU winner, Elizabeth Donahue of Poughkeepsie, lost 31 lbs. in the program and continues her healthy regimen today, participating in the popular Spartan Races, fitness challenges through Gold’ Gym, and tackling indoor high ropes courses. Though not the primary goal of the program, but a healthy side effect of exercising daily and eating healthier, her total weight loss since beginning BetterU is now over 70 pounds. She credits BetterU as the catalyst for her new healthier lifestyle, and praises Gold’s Gym trainers for inspiring her to keep going.

“In the beginning it was hard. I was mindlessly eating. I was sore from working out,” she said, “BetterU showed me what I was capable of. I realized I was so much stronger than I ever thought I could be, much stronger than I was.”

To download an application, deadline June 24th, visit http://dutchessulstergored.heart.org. For more information, contact Teresa Marra at 845-867-5377 or email Teresa.marra@heart.org.

BetterU is sponsored by Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Gold’s Gym, Health Quest Medical Practice, the Poughkeepsie Journal and Q92. Go Red For Women is sponsored nationally by Macy’s and locally by Health Quest, The Heart Center, Q92 and the Poughkeepsie Journal.

By |June 2nd, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Nominate Heroes for CPR Award

Imagine you were at work and your co-worker collapsed next to you—his heartbeat stopped. You only have four minutes to help before he dies. Would you know what to do to save his life?

Luckily for Bob Wilson, his Culinary Institute of America colleagues knew what to do. They used CPR and an AED when his heart suddenly stopped beating while he was walking on campus. His rescuers will be honored at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 1st Annual Volunteer Awards event on June 14th at the Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel. The AHA want to celebrate other local heroes who have used CPR to help save a life at the June event. Nominate someone at: http://bit.ly/CPRHeroHV.

Carl Williams, Robert Wilson, Jeff Levine

Carl Wilson, Robert Wilson, Jeff Levine. Photo credit: CIA/Phil Mansfield

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death. This electrical malfunction in the he

art causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) disrupting the normal flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs, causing death within minutes. Each year, over 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. According to the AHA, 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. But when a bystander immediately uses CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim’s chance of survival.

Wilson had trouble breathing and collapsed while walking with a friend, Laurie Lecomte, on their usual morning walk. She ran to get a campus safety officer, and Carl Wilson (no relation) responded as Safety Dispatcher Al Seifert called 9-1-1. Jeff Levine, Communications Manager at the CIA, and Neil Garrison, Supervisor of Environmental Health & Safety, both former EMTs, had just arrived in the parking lot for their workdays, and saw their colleague giving CPR to a victim. They ran to assist as Safety Officer, Rob Barclay brought an automatic external defibrillator, which can restore a normal heart rhythm. EMS paramedics arrived quickly and took over. He was transported to Vassar Hospital and was back to work three weeks later.

“Why did Bob Wilson survive? Because the Chain of Survival is strong at the Culinary. First, his colleagues recognized it was a cardiac emergency—they got help immediately and called 911. He’s alive because three bystanders knew CPR and didn’t delay in using it. They brought an AED to Bob’s side for early defibrillation, and paramedics were at the scene quickly. Without their fast intervention and training in CPR, we wouldn’t be celebrating Bob Wilson’s life,” said David Violante, Arlington Fire District Director of Emergency Medical Services, and AHA board member.

As rare as survival is from cardiac arrest, this is the second cardiac arrest victim saved on campus. In 2008, CIA student Douglas Chrisman collapsed during class in a kitchen. Again, the Chain of Survival was strong and his life was saved. Carl Wilson and Garrison assisted then, too.chain of survival

Levine said when he was an EMT, he’d used CPR dozens of times, with only two victims surviving. This was the first friend he saved with CPR. Garrison is an American Heart Association CPR/AED & First Aid Instructor.

“We train for this very situation, but we hope it never happens,” said Garrison, “It just proves that the chain of survival here on campus and in the local community is strong and does work.  Being CPR-trained is a life skill that everyone should have and the opportunity to help someone can occur anywhere and anytime, when least expected,” said Garrison.

Why should you know CPR? The AHA states that 70 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen outside the hospital—you will most likely be trying to save the life of someone you love. View the AHA’s training video at www.handsonlycpr.org.

By |May 31st, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

Save Lives from Stroke by Sharing on Social Media

American Stroke Month Social Media

Someone has a stroke every 40 seconds in the U.S. But 80% of strokes are preventable and stroke is largely treatable. Knowing your risk factors, the warning signs and how to respond during a stroke could save a life.

Help us educate others about stroke by sharing our suggested social media content below on your personal or company channels. Together, let’s end stroke! Use the below social media messages to help spread the word. Get more free resources at www.strokeassociation.org/strokemonth 

Images are available for both Facebook and Twitter. Simply ” right click / save as ” to download the image(s) of your choice and copy and paste the corresponding messaging.

SUGGESTED SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT:

 

By |May 10th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Learn Five Things Every Stroke Hero Should Know!

Learn Five Things Every Stroke Hero Should Know!
You don’t need superpowers to be a Stroke Hero, but you do need to pay attention to the risk factors and know the warning signs.

Every 40 seconds, someone has a stroke in the United States, but 80 percent of all strokes can be prevented!

This May for American Stroke Month, join Stroke Heroes across the nation in learning and sharing steps to live healthier lives in effort to prevent stroke and what to do in the case of a stroke emergency.

Here is how you can take action and help us put an end to this menacing disease named Stroke.

 strokeherowoman 5 things stroke

To learn more ways on how you can be a Stroke Hero, visit StrokeAssociation.org/StrokeHero.

By |May 3rd, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Heart Volunteers Walk in Rain to Help Their Hearts – and other Hearts

Hundreds of “hearty” volunteer supporters braved Sunday’s steady rain to support the American Heart Association’s Heart Walk event at Lake Welch Beach at Harriman State Park. Many local companies’ teams walked to support the AHA’s mission of saving lives from heart disease and stroke—leading killers locally and nationwide.TriCountyHeartWalkers2016

The Heart Walk included fun activities for children, entertainment by the Nyack High School “Red Storm” marching band, health information and vendors. Blood pressure screenings gave walkers these critical numbers and raised awareness on this first day of May/American Stroke Month. Learn how to be a Stroke Hero for American Stroke Month at www.StrokeAssociation.org/strokemonth.

Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S.  The American Heart Association’s funding for cardiovascular disease, as well as pediatric cardiac research, is second only to the federal government.

Two local residents were honored for sharing their stories of survival from heart disease to raise awareness and inspire the community to support the AHA’s mission. Their stories inspired others to support the American Heart Association’s research. AHA-funded researchers developed cardiac cath and drug-eluding stents.

In November 2004, Wallkill resident, Leone Semerano, RN, thought was experiencing food poisoning but as symptoms got worse, she knew it was her heart. She had cardiac LeoneSemeranoLuchLicursicatheterization and two stents inserted into her blocked heart arteries, and returned back to work one month later. She was only 51 years old.

On September 30, 2015 Luciano “Luch” Licursi arrived to work at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital and started to feel sick with sweating, tightening of the chest, and overall discomfort. He knew this feeling all too well, having had a heart attack in 2004 at the age of 39, that resulted in 50% loss of heart functionality. He had lifesaving emergency angioplasty and spent four days in the intensive care unit and is now back to work full-time.RaySharo

Ray Sharo, a 2015 Honoree, ran the route this year. He’s now running half-marathons since recovering from his 2012 open heart surgery. He had no symptoms prior to open heart surgery–just a routine EKG led to finding four artery blockages. Sharo, exercises most every day, including leading kayak tours on the Hudson River.

While research and advancements in treatments can save many lives, many more lives can be saved with simple lifestyle changes like eating healthier and walking 30 minutes every day.

To make a donation online visit www.tricountheartwalk.org or call Jo Ann Parker, Heart Walk Director at 845-542-4580.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by My Heart. My Life. Sponsor, Bon Secours Charity Health System; National Eating Healthy Day Sponsor, Orange Regional Medical Center; Nice-Pak, PDI, the National Walking Day sponsor;  as well as other local sponsors, Crothall Healthcare, St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital,  and our new “Active Kids Challenge” Sponsor, Active International, kids’ obstacle course sponsor. Townsquare Media is the radio media sponsor.

tricountyheartwalk2016

By |May 2nd, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Stroke Coordinators Apply for Scholarship for NECC in RI

The NECC 11th Annual Summit
October 20-21, 2016
Newport Marriott, Newport, RI

Nancy Kostel-Donlon Stroke Coordinators Scholarship
Call for Applications
Deadline April 29, 2016

Nancy Kostel-Donlon, a stroke coordinator from St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, NY, suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm and passed away on September 17, 2010. Nancy was a committed nurse, educator and mentor for the past 30 years. The Nancy Kostel-Donlon Stroke Coordinator Scholarship was created in 2011 to honor the memory of Nancy Kostel-Donlon by recognizing the Stroke Coordinator who best exemplifies her commitment to quality improvement, patient education, and mentorship.

The Criteria for the Nancy Kostel-Donlon Stroke Coordinator Scholarship include:

  • Must serve as your hospital Stroke Coordinator (title may vary)
  • It is unlikely that your hospital will be able to financially support your attendance
  • New to the Stroke Coordinator Role (less than 2 years) OR
  • In the Stroke Coordinator Role for more than 2 years and actively mentor others

In addition to completing the online application, all applicants must submit a letter of recommendation from a peer or supervisor to complete your application. Letters can be sent via email to Mia.Freedenfeld@heart.org or fax to 203-303-3346.

Please click on the following link to complete the application form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P5WBHLL

The Scholarship Recipient will receive the following:

  • Waived registration fee to attend the 2016 Summit – October 20-21, 2016
  • Travel Expenses Reimbursed
  • Hotel Accommodations at the Newport Marriott

Find out More About This Scholarship and Previous Recipients!

The deadline to submit an application is Friday, April 29, 2016.
All applicants will be notified by May 20, 2016.

To assist you in preparing your application click here for a pdf of the questions asked.
*Please note you must complete the online form to be included in the applications.

Call For Poster Abstracts
Deadline July 11, 2016

Find out More!

Instructions for Submitting an Abstract:

  • Deadline for abstract submission is July 11, 2016.
  • Applicants will receive notification upon receipt of submitted abstracts – sent weekly on Tuesdays.
  • Abstract submissions will be reviewed by The NECC Planning Committee and notifications will be sent to all applicants by August 1, 2016.
  • Expenses associated with the submission and presentation of an abstract are the responsibility of the presenter.
  • Presenting/submitting authors must register and pay for attendance at the conference.
  • Abstracts selected will be published on The NECC website www.thenecc.org.

When you are ready to submit your abstract please click on the following link and complete the required form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HPYY8QT

By |April 18th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments